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Welcome to the iPMI Magazine online report centre, designed specifically with your businesses educational needs in mind. Here you may browse a range of highly specialist, niche, market research reports covering the hottest topics in the insurance industry today.

International Private Medical Insurance Market Updates With iPMI Analyst Ian Youngman

In the article International Health Insurance 2021 IPMI market report author Ian Youngman, looks at the latest developments in the international private medical insurance market including:

  • The recent Bupa/Generali deal;
  • British expatriates in Spain;
  • Changes to the law for foreign investors in Indian insurance companies;
  • How health insurance premiums will grow in China;
  • Opportunities in Health Insurance in Iran.

British expats in Spain

In 2020 there were 360,000 British expats in Spain. Some work there and some retire to there.

Many have a UK home and a Spanish home. They spend 6 months in the UK and 6 months in Spain. This worked when the UK was in the EU. Now they have to choose between living in Spain full time or for less than 3 months. Many are selling up in Spain.

This will hit the IPMI market for those small UK agencies targeting British expats.

Bupa and Generali

There have been rumours on the grid for months that Generali was getting out of writing IPMI.

The Bupa/Generali deal allows Generali to concentrate on other areas it is better and bigger at - while allowing Bupa to enter or expand in many countries without having to build or increase a local infrastructure.

Global IPMI is now something you can no longer dabble in. You either commit globally or where you want to be. So I expect more insurer/insurer deals.

Yes, an insurer can decide only to offer IPMI in select countries. That works for individuals and SMEs. But what happens when your biggest corporate customers decide to become major players in a country where you have withdrawn from or refuse to enter, and you need a local base or partner as offshore IPMI is not allowed?

RELATED READING: International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

India

Indian Insurance Companies (Foreign Investment) Amendment Rules, 2021 apply to new and existing insurers with foreign shareholders.

This increased the foreign investment ceiling from 49% to 74% in the insurance industry from May 2021, as the government seeks capital injections and growth in the insurance sector.

Indian insurance companies that have foreign investors must have the majority of their directors and key management persons as resident Indian citizens. At least one of the following – board chairperson, managing director, or CEO – must also meet the citizenship requirements.

Insurers have until May 2022 to comply with these new rules.

Several IPMI insurers have started the process of increasing their stake in Indian subsidiaries.

China

Health insurance premiums in China will grow by 14% annually over the next 10 years, and China's share of global health premiums will rise from less than 2% today to 4.2% in 2029, forecasts Swiss Re Institute (SRI) in a Sigma report.

In China, new business will support double-digit growth in PMI premiums. State figures say that by end 2021 1.4 billion people have health insurance plus 236 million with maternity insurance.

In spite of fast-growing household incomes and also insurance penetration, a still-large health protection gap in China exists. The development of private health insurance, in particular products for the fast-growing middle-income class, is a key to closing the gap. The experience of China in effecting greater uptake of private health insurance has reduced high out of pocket expenses.

Foreign ownership in China is complex but IPMI insurers see this as a massive market

Iran

Hiss boo - the pantomime villain of the world, if you only read Western media.

The second biggest economy in the Middle East is making massive progress on its own and by new deals with Russia and China on infrastructure and trade, and hard currency that the US and Europe thought they had cut off.

The US, after its massive success in Afghanistan and Iraq somehow thinks it can bring about regime change by economic and political pressure - dream on.

While European and US insurers are banned from Iran by their governments - expect Chinese health insurers to move in.

So if you are a US or EU insurer – if you own or part own a Chinese insurer- it can write offshore business in Iran! 

RELATED READING: International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

Leading international private medical insurance publisher iPMI Magazine is excited to announce the launch of the “International Health Insurance 2021" IPMI market report written by leading insurance and healthcare analyst Ian Youngman.

There are now 80 million expatriates, 5 million international students, 4 million temporary foreign workers, and 18 million high net worth individuals of which 2.7 million are ultra high net worth. All of these are targets for international private medical insurance.

How To Buy International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

We are selling the report on Research and Markets for £3600 for all 3 volumes. However, if you are an advertiser or iPMI Magazine subscriber, we are offering the report at a reduced price. To take advantage of this offer please complete the form here, or write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com

About The Author

Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

 

Read more...

The Best And Worst Destinations For Living And Working Abroad

The Expat Insider 2021 Survey is out now, and the results reveal the best and worst destinations for living and working overseas.

Ian Youngman, Author of the International Health Insurance 2021 report comments, "Among all the doom and gloom I have heard suggestions that not only were some companies thinking of moving people away from cities into the country but also thinking of moving people abroad. The other vibe is that rather than moving back home - as the media suggests- most expats have opted to stay but perhaps move to the country or move from cities. This is the first time that I have seen any evidence that more people are thinking of moving abroad.

In the UK there is already a trend to move from cities into the country and either work remotely or commute. In my village, every week estate agents ask if I want to sell up - local house prices have shot up over 10% in a few months. So if you think this through globally, with remote work globally being possible and digital nomads becoming a new breed of expats, people are looking to move from cities- and that may mean moving abroad. Nobody can predict figures but I expect expat numbers to increase every year in the next few years - from individuals and companies.

There are now 80 million expatriates, 5 million international students, 4 million temporary foreign workers, and 18 million high net worth individuals of which 2.7 million are ultra high net worth."

RELATED READING: International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

The Best Destinations for Living and Working in 2021

1. Taiwan 

Taiwan ranks 1st out of 59 destinations for the third year in a row in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. It also comes first in the Quality of Life and Working Abroad Indices: Most expats are satisfied with their job security (83% vs. 61% globally) and the state of the local economy (85% vs. 62% globally). Additionally, the majority is happy with their job (75% vs. 68% globally) and their life in general (80% vs. 75% globally). Furthermore, 96% of expats rate the quality of medical care positively (vs. 71% globally), and another 94% are satisfied with its affordability (vs. 61% globally). An expat from Chile shares: “The Taiwanese healthcare system truly considers people as human beings instead of mere numbers.” Moreover, not a single expat (0%) feels personally unsafe in Taiwan (vs. 8% globally). An expat from Canada shares: “I can live independently. I feel safe wherever I go, and everything is convenient.” 

Although Taiwan places slightly lower in the Ease of Settling In Index (13th), it is the best-ranking country worldwide in the Friendliness subcategory (1st). Most expats find it easy to make friends there (62% vs. 48% globally) and describe the Taiwanese population as friendly towards foreign residents (96% vs. 67% globally).  

2. Mexico 

Mexico ranks 2nd out of 59 destinations worldwide. It is even rated the best country for expats in the Ease of Settling In Index (1st): 85% find it easy to settle down in Mexico (vs. 62% globally), and 78% say it is easy to make local friends (vs. 44% globally). A US American expat says that “the culture and friendliness of the local people” is their favorite thing about living in Mexico.  

Mexico also does well in the Personal Finance (2nd) and Cost of Living (4th) Indices. In fact, four in five expats (80%) are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally), and 90% say their disposable household income is enough or more than enough to cover their living expenses (vs. 77% globally).  

Mexico performs slightly below average in the Quality of Life Index (31st). It comes in 42nd place in the Quality of the Environment subcategory, with 27% of expats being unhappy with the water and sanitation infrastructure (vs. 12% globally). Additionally, Mexico even ends up among the bottom 10 of the Safety & Security subcategory (51st), with 20% of expats concerned about their personal safety (vs. 8% globally). Despite that, 89% of expats in Mexico are happy with their life in general (vs. 75% globally), placing the country first worldwide for personal happiness.  

3. Costa Rica 

Costa Rica places 3rd out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. It ranks among the top 5 in the Ease of Settling In Index (3rd), with 91% of expats describing the population as generally friendly (vs. 69% globally). Another 87% describe the local residents as generally friendly towards foreign ones (vs. 67% globally), and 70% find it easy to make local friends (vs. 44% globally). “I love the social life and culture,” shares a US American expat. Maybe this is why most survey respondents find it easy to get used to the local culture (82% vs. 65% globally) and feel at home in it too (80% vs. 63% globally).  

Costa Rica performs well in the Quality of Life Index (14th), coming in second place worldwide for personal happiness — just behind Mexico (1st). All things considered, 88% of expats in Costa Rica are happy with their life (vs. 75% globally). The country comes 10th in the Quality of the Environment subcategory, with the majority of expats rating the natural environment (96% vs. 84% globally) and the air quality (91% vs. 66% globally) positively. However, Costa Rica lands in the bottom 10 of the Travel & Transportation subcategory (52nd): 29% of expats are unhappy with the public transportation system (vs. 15% globally). A Canadian expat shares: “Traffic is terrible because of poor drivers, bad roads, and insufficient infrastructure.”  

On the upside, Costa Rica makes it into the top 10 of the Personal Finance Index (7th), with 84% of expats considering their disposable household income enough or more than enough to cover all expenses (vs. 77% globally).  

4. Malaysia 

Ranking 4th out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Malaysia ranks above the global average in every index. The country does particularly well in the Ease of Settling In Index (2nd) — as a US American expat puts it: “It is easy to live here, and the people are wonderful.” In fact, most expats find it easy to settle down in Malaysia (77% vs. 62% globally) and to make new friends there (66% vs. 48% globally). It might help that Malaysia ranks first in the Language subcategory: 92% of expats find it easy to live there without speaking the local language (vs. 54% globally), while 45% also consider it easy to learn (vs. 39% globally).  

The country also does exceedingly well in the Cost of Living Index (2nd), where just Vietnam (1st) performs better. In fact, 82% of expats rate the cost of living in Malaysia positively (vs. 48% globally). With the destination ranking 9th in the Personal Finance Index, 73% of expats are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally), and 85% say their disposable household income is enough or more than enough to cover their expenses (vs. 77% globally).  

Malaysia does worst in the Working Abroad Index, but it still lands in a slightly above-average 25th place: 72% of expats are satisfied with their working hours (vs. 66% globally), and 69% are happy with their job in general (vs. 68% globally). 

5. Portugal 

Portugal ranks 5th out of 59 destinations in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, performing best in the Quality of Life Index (3rd) — just behind Taiwan (1st) and Austria (2nd). The country ranks third in the Personal Happiness subcategory of this index, with 84% of expats being happy with their life in general (vs. 75% globally). What is more, 87% of expats are satisfied with the local leisure options (vs. 72% globally), and 90% say the same about the climate and weather (vs. 66% globally). “I like the weather and the laid-back lifestyle,” says a French expat.  

Portugal also makes it into the top 10 of the Ease of Settling In Index (9th), coming sixth in the Friendliness subcategory. In fact, 87% of expats find the local residents generally friendly, compared to just 69% globally. Portugal even ranks second worldwide in the Feeling at Home subcategory, where just Mexico (1st) performs better. The majority of expats feels at home in the local culture (83% vs. 63% globally) and finds it easy to settle down in the country (84% vs. 62% globally).  

Portugal receives its worst — but still fairly average — results in the Working Abroad Index (36th). The destination places 44th in the Career Prospects & Satisfaction subcategory, though, with more than half the expats (51%) unsatisfied with the local career opportunities (vs. 33% globally). However, 70% of expats are at least happy with their work-life balance (vs. 66% globally).  

6. New Zealand 

New Zealand almost makes it into the global top 5 of the Expat Insider 2021 ranking, coming 6th out of 59 countries. It performs particularly well for working abroad (2nd): 81% of expats consider their job secure (vs. 61% globally), and 64% feel optimistic about local career options (vs. 45% globally). At the same time, expats enjoy a great work-life balance (83% satisfied vs. 66% globally).  

The country comes in 11th place in the Quality of Life Index, doing especially well in the Digital Life subcategory (5th): 98% are happy with the cashless payment options (vs. 83% globally), and 89% rate the availability of government services online favorably (vs. 63% globally). What is more, New Zealand has the best ratings worldwide for its natural environment (100% positive vs. 84% globally), coming in 6th place in the Quality of Environment subcategory. Last but not least, it is a very safe and stable country to settle down in: 95% of expats describe New Zealand as peaceful (vs. 80% globally), and not one single respondent rates its political stability negatively, compared to about one in six (16%) globally. “I love my peaceful, calm, and safe existence in New Zealand,” a US expat comments.  

The results for the ease of settling in are only slightly worse (16th). Expats find it easy to settle down in New Zealand (77% positive ratings vs. 62% globally), and 82% describe the local residents as friendly (vs. 69% globally).  

7. Australia 

In the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Australia (7th out of 59) lands among the top 10 destinations worldwide. While it ranks sixth in the Quality of Life Index overall, it comes first worldwide for its local leisure activities (87% positive ratings vs. 72% globally). An impressive 97% of respondents also praise the natural environment (vs. 84% globally). “Living in close proximity to nature — close to the beach and the rainforest — is so amazing!”, says a US expat. Lastly, it ranks very well in the Digital Life subcategory (8th) as, for instance, 89% of expats appreciate the availability of government services online (vs. 63% worldwide). However, opinions are divided on the topic of healthcare in Australia: while 88% of expats are satisfied with its quality (vs. 71% globally), just 68% consider it affordable (vs. 61% globally).  

Australia does well in the Working Abroad Index (10th). Expats are especially satisfied with their local career opportunities (60% positive ratings vs. 45% globally) and their work-life balance (76% positive responses vs. 66% globally). Even Australia’s somewhat worse results in the Ease of Settling In Index (18th) still place it in the top 20. Expats find it especially easy to get used to the local culture (76% positive responses vs. 65% globally) and to settle down in Australia (74% vs. 62% worldwide). However, only a slightly above-average 54% find it easy to make new friends there (vs. 48% globally).  

8. Ecuador  

Coming in 8th place out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Ecuador performs best in the Personal Finance Index (5th). Close to three in four expats (73%) are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally). Moreover, 91% describe their disposable household income as enough or more than enough to cover their expenses (vs. 77% globally). This places the country third for this factor, just behind India (2nd) and Vietnam (1st). Ecuador also lands among the top 10 in the Cost of Living Index (7th), with 78% of expats rating this aspect of life abroad positively (vs. 48% globally).  

In the Ease of Settling In Index (10th), the country ranks sixth in the Feeling at Home subcategory. The majority of expats (82%) finds it easy to settle down in Ecuador (vs. 62% globally), 80% feel at home in the local culture (vs. 63% globally), and 68% find it easy to make new friends in general (vs. 48% globally).  

Ecuador shows a slightly weaker performance in the Quality of Life Index (24th). Still, nearly all expats (96%) rate the country’s natural environment positively (vs. 84% globally), and 85% are satisfied with their socializing and leisure activities (vs. 67% globally). “The nature and scenery are great,” shares a Venezuelan expat. However, in the Digital Life subcategory (45th), Ecuador comes last worldwide (59th) for cashless payment options, with 37% rating this factor negatively (vs. 9% globally).  

9. Canada 

Making it into the top 10 out of 59 destinations, Canada (9th overall) performs well in most indices of the Expat Insider 2021 survey. The country ranks best in the Quality of Life Index (5th), with the majority of expats finding it easy to get high speed internet at home (92% vs. 79% globally) and to pay without cash (96% vs. 83% globally). Additionally, 86% are happy with the availability of government services online, compared to 63% globally. Most expats are also satisfied with the affordability of healthcare in Canada (85% vs. 61% globally) and the country’s political stability (90% vs. 64% globally). “Healthcare is a basic right, and the quality of life is very good in Canada,” says a US American expat.  

Canada also performs well in the Working Abroad and Ease of Settling In Indices (12th for both). It even lands in the top 10 of the Feeling at Home subcategory (7th), with 73% of survey respondents feeling at home in the local culture (vs. 63% globally). In terms of work, close to two out of three expats (64%) rate the career opportunities positively (vs. 45% globally).  

On the other hand, Canada ends up among the bottom 10 of the Personal Finance Index (50th). Nearly a third of expats (32%) say their disposable income is not enough to cover all their living expenses (vs. 23% globally). An expat from Mexico shares that “the best cities are really expensive. It is hard to become a homeowner with an average income.”  

10. Vietnam  

Coming in 10th place out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Vietnam ranks first in both the Personal Finance and Cost of Living Indices. The majority of expats (85%) rates the cost of living positively (vs. 48% globally), and 78% are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally).  

Vietnam also does well in the Working Abroad Index (9th), with the vast majority of expats (86%) expressing overall job satisfaction (vs. 68% globally). Placing 25th in the Ease of Settling In Index, Vietnam does especially well in the Finding Friends subcategory (9th). According to 63% of expats, making local friends is easy (vs. 44% globally), and another 67% find it easy to make new friends in general (vs. 48% globally). What is more, the majority (81%) considers the local residents generally friendly (vs. 69% globally).  

Despite its great performance in the overall ranking, Vietnam ends up among the bottom 10 in the Quality of Life Index (53rd). More than three in five expats (63%) rate the air quality in Vietnam negatively (vs. 20% globally), and 42% are unhappy with the water and sanitation infrastructure (vs. 12% globally). A Swiss expat shares: “Plastic pollution is a major problem, especially along the coast.” However, 85% of expats in Vietnam are still generally happy with their life (vs. 75% globally).  

The Worst Destinations for Living and Working in 2021 

59. Kuwait 

For the seventh time in eight years, Kuwait (59th out of 59 countries) comes in last place in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. The country ranks last in the Quality of Life Index (59th), with especially poor results in the Leisure Options, Personal Happiness, and Travel & Transportation subcategories (59th for all). In fact, 58% of expats in Kuwait are unhappy with the local leisure options (vs. 14% globally), and 50% rate the climate and weather negatively (vs. 17% globally). Additionally, 29% state that they are generally unhappy (vs. 10% globally).  

Kuwait comes last in the Ease of Settling In Index (59th), with 46% of expats not feeling at home in the local culture (vs. 20% globally) and 45% finding it difficult to settle down in this country (vs. 22% globally). Moreover, 51% have trouble finding new friends (vs. 32% globally), and 62% find it difficult to make local friends in particular (vs. 36% globally). The country ranks last for friendliness (59th) as well: 36% of expats rate the general friendliness of the population negatively (vs. 16% globally), while another 44% describe the people as unfriendly towards foreign residents (vs. 18% globally).  

Placing 56th in the Working Abroad Index, Kuwait performs poorly in both the Work & Leisure (58th) and the Career Prospects & Satisfaction (57th) subcategories. More than three in ten respondents (31%) are dissatisfied with their job in general (vs. 16% globally), and 34% are unhappy with their work-life balance (vs. 17% globally).  

58. Italy 

Coming in 58th place in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Italy is the second-worst country for expats — ranking only ahead of Kuwait (59th). In the Personal Finance Index (59th), the Southern European country even lands in last place worldwide: 30% of expats are dissatisfied with their financial situation (vs. 19% globally), 14% even very much so, twice the share of the global average (7%). Furthermore, one in three expats (33%) says their disposable household income is not enough to cover their expenses (vs. 23% globally).  

Italy also performs poorly in the Working Abroad Index (58th), only ahead of Turkey (59th), coming last in the Career Prospects & Satisfaction subcategory (59th). More than half the expats (56%) rate their local career opportunities negatively (vs. 33% globally), and 31% are dissatisfied with their job (vs. 16% globally). An Iranian expat shares: “Finding a job is not easy for foreigners, not even for the well-educated ones.”  

Within the Quality of Life Index (42nd), Italy ranks worst in the Digital Life subcategory (51st): 23% of expats find it difficult to get high-speed internet access at home (vs. 12% globally), 18% consider it difficult to pay without cash (vs. 9% globally), and 40% are unhappy with the availability of government services online (vs. 21% globally). Overall, there are only few upsides about expat life in Italy, such as the climate and weather (71% happy vs. 66% globally) and the travel opportunities (88% happy vs. 84% globally). 

57. South Africa 

Coming in 57th place out of 59 destinations in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, South Africa ends up in the bottom 3 — only ahead of Italy (58th) and Kuwait (59th). It performs worst in the Personal Finance Index (55th): over one-third of expats in South Africa (34%) do not consider their disposable household income enough to cover all their expenses (vs. 24% globally), and just 57% of expats in South Africa are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally).  

South Africa also ends up among the bottom 10 of the Working Abroad Index (54th), coming last worldwide in the Economy & Job Security subcategory (59th). Only 47% of expats are satisfied with their job security (vs. 61% globally), and less than a third (31%) are happy with the state of the local economy — exactly half the global average (62%).  

Ranking among the bottom 10 in the Quality of Life Index (52nd), South Africa ranks last worldwide in the Safety & Security subcategory (59th). More than one-third of expats (34%) do not consider South Africa a peaceful country (vs. 9% globally) and just about one in four (24%) feel safe there (vs. 84% globally). An Ethiopian expat even says: “You are not able to walk around safely.” However, South Africa does well in the Leisure Options subcategory (15th), with 87% of expats rating the climate and weather favorably (vs. 66% globally). The majority (95%) is also satisfied with the natural environment (vs. 84% globally). “I like the climate, the diverse coastlines, and South Africa’s natural beauty,” summarizes a German expat. 

56. Russia 

Out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, Russia (56th) lands in the bottom 10. It performs worst in the Working Abroad Index (52nd): Close to one in four expats (24% each) rate the state of the local economy negatively (vs. 19% globally) and are unhappy with their job security (vs. 20% globally).  

Narrowly escaping the bottom 10 in the Quality of Life Index (49th), Russia performs especially poorly in the Quality of the Environment subcategory (49th). Expats are unhappy with the air quality (31% vs. 20% globally), the water and sanitation infrastructure (21% vs. 12% globally), and the natural environment (14% vs. 8% globally). “I do not like the lack of any meaningful efforts or policies to reduce environmental pollution and to support basic recycling,” shares a US American expat.  

With Russia coming in 48th place in the Ease of Settling In Index, 29% of respondents find it difficult to settle down in this country (vs. 22% globally). What is more, Russia ends up in the bottom 10 of the Language subcategory (58th), only ahead of Japan (59th). Nearly half the expats (48%) find it difficult to live in Russia’s cities without speaking the local language (vs. 29% globally), and two-thirds (67%) find it difficult to learn Russian (vs. 42% globally). Russia receives its best result in the Cost of Living Index (25th): 49% of expats rate the cost of living positively, which is, however, still just one percentage point above the global average (48%). 

55. Egypt  

Egypt (55th out of 59) also ranks the bottom 10 of the Expat Insider 2021 survey. The country performs worst in the Quality of Life Index (57th), where only India (58th) and Kuwait (59th) do worse. In fact, 39% of expats in Egypt rate the water and sanitation infrastructure negatively (vs. 12% globally), and 48% give the air quality a negative rating (vs. 20% globally). “The air quality is bad, and there are only few green spaces,” shares an Afghan expat. Landing at the very bottom, Egypt performs even worse in the Digital Life subcategory (59th). Exactly three in five expats (60%) rate the availability of government services online negatively (vs. 21% globally), 34% find it difficult to get high-speed internet access at home (vs. 12% globally), and 32% consider it hard to pay without cash (% vs. 9% globally).  

Also ending up among the bottom 10 of the Working Abroad Index (53rd), Egypt receives extremely poor results in the Career Prospects & Satisfaction (55th) and Economy & Job Security (53rd) subcategories. A quarter of expats (25%) are dissatisfied with their job in general (vs. 16% globally), and 46% rate the local career opportunities negatively (vs. 33% globally).  

The country performs better in the Cost of Living (19th) and Ease of Settling In (30th) Indices: 61% of expats rate the cost of living positively (vs. 48% globally) and 57% find it easy to make local friends (vs. 44% globally).  

54. Japan 

Japan ranks 54th out of 59 countries featured in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. Performing particularly poorly in the Ease of Settling In Index (58th), Japan only ranks better than Kuwait (59th). Just 36% of expats find it easy to settle down in Japan (vs. 62% globally), and a mere 45% feel at home in the local culture (vs. 63% globally).  

In the Working Abroad Index (50th), 30% of expats are unhappy with their work-life balance (vs. 17% globally). A US American expat living in Hashimoto even says that “the work-life balance here is atrocious”. Japan also receives poor results in the Personal Finance Index (54th), with 26% of expats dissatisfied with their financial situation (vs. 19% globally).  

On the upside, Japan has an above-average performance in the Quality of Life Index (21st). With the country coming 12th for the quality of the environment, 94% of expats rank the water and sanitation infrastructure positively, compared to 77% globally. Additionally, nearly all expats rate Japan positively for personal safety (97% vs. 84% globally) and peacefulness (95% vs. 80% globally). A Brazilian expat shares: “In Japan, there is a low crime rate throughout the country. It is very safe to walk on the streets at any time.” And a South African expat says: “Japan offers a safe environment, and most things are done properly with respect for others in mind.”  

53. Cyprus 

Cyprus lands in the bottom 10 overall, coming 53rd out of 59 destinations in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. It places 57th in the Working Abroad Index — just ahead of Turkey (59th) and Italy (58th). Close to half the expats (49%) are dissatisfied with the local career opportunities (vs. 33% globally), and more than a third (34%) rate the job security negatively (vs. 20% globally). A Nepalese expat shares: “It is difficult to find work, so I cannot afford college or my living expenses.” In fact, Cyprus also places in the bottom 10 of the Personal Finance Index (57th) and comes last for the disposable household income (59th). Close to two in five expats (39%) say their disposable household income is not enough to cover their expenses abroad (vs. 23% globally).  

Cyprus performs best in the Ease of Settling In Index (28th), with 66% feeling at home in the local culture (vs. 63% globally) and 70% describing the local population as generally friendly towards foreign residents (vs. 67% globally). Furthermore, 80% of expats find it easy to get around without knowing the local language(s) (vs. 54% globally).  

With Cyprus placing 34th in the Quality of Life Index, the majority of expats (89%) is happy with the local climate and weather (vs. 66% globally) — ranking the destination 5th worldwide for this factor. However, while 70% of respondents are happy with the air quality in Cyprus (vs. 66% globally), 14% rate the water and sanitation negatively (vs. 12% globally).  

52. Turkey 

Overall, Turkey (52nd out of 59) lands among the bottom 10 destinations in the Expat Insider 2021 survey. Ranking last worldwide in the Working Abroad Index (59th), Turkey ends up in the bottom 10 for every single subcategory: Career Prospects & Satisfaction (56th), Economy & Job Security (58th), and Work & Leisure (59th). In fact, expats in Turkey are dissatisfied with their working hours (32% vs. 16% globally), their job in general (29% vs. 16% globally), and their job security (30% vs. 20% globally). A British expat shares that “for expats, it is extremely difficult to get a work permit”.  

Turkey places 32nd in the Ease of Settling In Index, with more than half the expats (53%) finding it easy to make local friends (vs. 44% globally). Most expats consider the local residents to be friendly towards foreign ones (72% vs. 67% globally), and they are happy with the general friendliness of the population too (72% vs. 69% globally). “There is a general warmth and hospitality among the people around me,” shares a Russian expat.  

Coming in 35th place in the Quality of Life Index, Turkey ranks among the bottom 10 in the Digital Life subcategory (50th), though: 16% of expats find it difficult to get a local mobile phone number (vs. 7% globally), and 21% have trouble getting high-speed internet at home (vs. 12% globally). The country also lands in the bottom 10 for political stability (54th), with more than a third of expats (35%) rating this factor negatively (vs. 16% globally).  

51. India 

Coming in 51st place out of 59 countries, India also ranks among the bottom 10 of the Expat Insider 2021 survey. Despite the poor result overall, the country ranks fourth worldwide in the Personal Finance Index: 82% of expats in India are satisfied with their financial situation (vs. 64% globally), and 89% say their disposable household income is enough or more than enough to cover their expenses (vs. 77% globally). Additionally, India places 13th in the Cost of Living Index (69% positive ratings vs. 48% globally).  

India performs slightly below average in the Ease of Settling In Index (34th). More than three in five expats (62%) feel at home in the local culture (vs. 63% globally), and 79% say the local population is generally friendly towards foreign residents (vs. 67% globally). However, over half the expats (51%) find it difficult to settle down in India, compared to 22% globally.  

India receives the second-worst results worldwide in the Quality of Life Index (58th) — only ahead of Kuwait (59th) — and performs worst in the Quality of Environment subcategory (59th): 67% of expats rate the air quality negatively (vs. 20% globally), and more than half (54%) are unhappy with the water and sanitation infrastructure (vs. 12% globally). The overall quality of life is also lowered by India’s poor performance in the Safety & Security subcategory (56th). Just 29% are satisfied with the country’s political stability (vs. 64% globally) and just 72% feel safe in India’s cities (vs. 84% globally). 

50. Malta 

Malta comes in 50th place out of 59 countries in the Expat Insider 2021 survey, performing worst in the Quality of Life Index (54th). It ends up among the bottom 10 in the Quality of the Environment and Travel & Transportation subcategories (56th for both). More than half the expats in Malta (51%) are unhappy with the transportation infrastructure (vs. 15% globally), and 11% rate their travel opportunities negatively (vs. 7% globally). “There is no nature at all, no green spaces, poor infrastructure for children, and too much traffic and pollution,” shares an Italian expat. In fact, 38% of expats in Malta are unhappy with the natural environment (vs. 8% globally). Moreover, 35% rate the air quality negatively (vs. 20% globally), and 25% are dissatisfied with the water and sanitation infrastructure (vs. 12% globally). On the upside, Malta ranks 7th worldwide for its local climate and weather (92% positive ratings vs. 66% globally).  

Malta receives below-average results in the Cost of Living and Ease of Settling In Indices (35th for both). In fact, 20% of expats rate the friendliness of the local population towards foreign residents negatively (vs. 18% globally). Additionally, 37% of expats find it difficult to make local friends in Malta (vs. 36% globally).  

Expat Life during the COVID-19 Pandemic 

On a global scale, 45% of survey respondents say that COVID-19 had an impact on their current stay abroad or their relocation plans: the share of expats who say so (37%) either decided to not move back home in the near future (18%), planned to move to another country but had to change these plans (8%), will move to another country due to the pandemic (6%), or will move back home sooner than originally planned (5%).  

The share of local respondents whose relocation plans were affected by COVID-19 (61%) is a lot higher: some of them were living abroad but moved home sooner than planned (18%), others were planning to move abroad but had to change their plans (35%), and about one in ten have now decided to move abroad because of the pandemic (9%).  

The Pandemic’s Impact on Everyday Life 

Of course, COVID-19 has not only disrupted the relocation plans of expats worldwide. When asked where they see the biggest impact of the pandemic on their personal life right now, the survey respondents point out its effects on personal travel (25%), social life (23%), and their work or business (16%) in particular. In the long run, respondents are still concerned about the impact of COVID-19 on their social life (17% of all respondents), and there are also considerable worries regarding personal travel (22%).   

How Expats Stay Informed on COVID-19 

Expats across the world mostly rely on official government channels (48%), local news (47%), and social media (40%) for news on the COVID-19 situation and the related regulations in their country of residence. Considering the importance of government channels, just how satisfied are expats with the official communication regarding COVID-19 and related regulations? Worldwide, not quite two-thirds (66%) rate this factor positively, with close to a quarter (24%) saying they are completely satisfied. The main complaint among expats who are not satisfied with the official communication on the pandemic is that the information is unclear, confusing, and/or contradictory (67%).  

For further information on the global impact of COVID-19 on expat life, please take a look at the full press release in the download center of our e-mail.  

About the InterNations Expat Insider 2021 Survey  

For its annual Expat Insider survey, InterNations asked 12,420 expats representing 174 nationalities and living in 59 countries or territories to provide information on various aspects of expat life, as well as their gender, age, and nationality. Participants were asked to rate up to 37 different aspects of life abroad on a scale of one to seven. The rating process emphasized the respondents’ personal satisfaction with these aspects, considering both emotional topics and more factual aspects with equal weight. The respondents’ ratings of the individual factors were then bundled in various combinations for a total of 13 subcategories, and their mean values were used to draw up five topical indices: Quality of Life, Ease of Settling In, Working Abroad, Personal Finance, and Cost of Living. The first four of these indices were further averaged together with expats' general satisfaction with their life in order to rank 59 expat destinations around the world. In 2021, the top 10 are Taiwan, Mexico, Costa Rica, Malaysia, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Ecuador, Canada, and Vietnam. Moreover, expats were asked about how COVID-19 has impacted their life abroad; however, these responses did not influence the overall ranking.  

For a country to be featured in the indices and consequently in the overall ranking, a sample size of at least 50 survey participants per destination was necessary. 

Read more...

International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

Leading international private medical insurance publisher iPMI Magazine is excited to announce the launch of the “International Health Insurance 2021" IPMI market report written by leading insurance and healthcare analyst Ian Youngman.

There are now 80 million expatriates, 5 million international students, 4 million temporary foreign workers, and 18 million high net worth individuals of which 2.7 million are ultra high net worth. All of these are targets for international private medical insurance.

International health insurance for expats, third country nationals, domestic nationals and global nomads is a 3 volume iPMI market report updated in 2021 with even more companies and more countries.

Overview:

Expats and local workers of global companies and HNW individuals may no longer have the option of flying home or another country for medical treatment so may have to rely on local healthcare.

Global insurers have national and international healthcare networks that have a better capability for telemedicine than local insurers.

In almost every country the state healthcare network is under never before experienced pressure so access to private healthcare is increasingly essential. In some countries, expats will be at the back of the queue for state healthcare. In some countries, even access to private healthcare may be strained and hospitals may have to prioritise healthcare for long-term partners such as insurance companies over one-time private patients.

An increasing number of insurers are moving from being health insurers to healthcare providers protected by health insurance. With a linked move to Artificial Intelligence and teleconsultation, the world of IPMI is changing.

The fragile and volatile state of global stock markets is of concern to insurers who may already be vulnerable while offering opportunities to potential buyers of insurers and health insurance books of business. The environment for mergers and acquisitions among health insurers remains favourable as they continue to seek out diversification and growth opportunities.

The iPMI 2021 report includes 3 volumes:

  • Volume 1 Overview - 395 pages
  • Volume 2 Companies - 129 Company Profiles
  • Volume 3 Countries - 176 Country Profiles

Table Of Contents

1. Introduction

  • Overview
  • Growth of need for IPM
  • Health insurance definitions
  • Expatriate definitions
  • Voluntary health insurance
  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate
  • Social and technological disruption
  • Duty of care
  • Why insurers are moving into IPMI
  • The changing insurance ecosystem
  • Customer centricity
  • Blockchain
  • Emerging markets
  • Belt and Road initiative
  • Middle East and North Africa outlook
  • Asian health
  • IPMI must cover more than insurance
  • The future
  • Merging health insurance and healthcare
  • Swiss Re forecast
  • Changing how we work
  • Ageing workforce
  • Health insurance for older workers
  • Global mobility changes

2. International Health Insurance Numbers

  • Global premium figures
  • Onshoring and offshoring
  • Premium retention in countries
  • Premiums and local taxes
  • Local partnerships
  • Muddying the waters
  • It is not health insurance

3. Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance
  • Compulsory travel health insurance
  • Health insurance market potential
  • Global medical price trends
  • Health insurance pricing trends
  • Global health insurance costs and trends
  • Health insurance and universal healthcare global health benefits
  • Digital transformation
  • Dental and vision care

4. Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2019
  • Global healthcare
  • Healthcare in 2040
  • Future health, care and wellbeing by 2040Re-Opening the World - Life After COVIDUniversal healthcare
  • Health at a glance in LatAm and CaribbeaHealthcare in UAE

5. International Health Insurance Market

  • Buying the market overseas
  • Distribution
  • Healthcare or health insurance
  • History
  • Market potential
  • Hospitals offering health insurance
  • Numbers of insurers
  • Insurance companies
  • Latin American healthcare potential
  • Lloyd’s of London
  • Lloyds’ brokers
  • Managing general agents
  • Third party administrators
  • Insurance brokers
  • Financial advisors
  • Insurance agents
  • Banks
  • Health insurance trade bodies
  • Health insurance comparison sites
  • Micro-insurance
  • Mobile devices
  • Self- insurance
  • Smartphones
  • Social media
  • Videos

6. International Health Insurance Products

  • Cover
  • International insurance versus domestic insurance
  • IPMI in 2021

7. Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures
  • Global numbers of expatriates
  • Global population
  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees
  • Global mobility
  • Expatriate population as % of the worldwide population
  • Expatriate or international migrant
  • International students
  • Migrant workers
  • Cross border workers
  • Digital nomads
  • Diasporas
  • Migration and health

8. Customers

  • Target markets for insurers
  • What is an expatriate?
  • Expatriate characteristics
  • Expatriate salaries and benefits
  • Buyers
  • Dependants
  • Emerging markets middle class
  • Generation Y
  • High net worth
  • How people choose the international health insurance
  • Indian companies
  • Maritime
  • Mining
  • More than one product
  • Music industry
  • NGOs
  • Need
  • Oil and gas
  • Older workers
  • Overseas employees need support
  • Pilots
  • Questions potential customers ask
  • Retirees
  • Self-employed
  • Short assignments
  • Short-term cover
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Target ages
  • Teachers
  • Wealthy expatriates
  • Who can be covered?
  • Why companies buy it
  • Why individuals buy it
  • Why needs are changing
  • Why not just buy cover locally
  • Women

9. The product

  • Addiction treatment
  • Admitted policies
  • Apps
  • Big data
  • Budget covers
  • Cancer
  • Chatbots
  • Choice of cover or set packages
  • Claims
  • Compliance with local law
  • Co-payments
  • Critical illness
  • Currency
  • Danger zones
  • Diabetes treatment
  • Diaspora insurance
  • Duty of care
  • Emergency assistance
  • Emergency evacuation
  • European Air Medical Institute
  • Fertility treatment
  • Fraud
  • Funeral plans
  • Global cover
  • Helplines
  • Income protection
  • Insurers rethink of health insurance
  • International medical accreditation
  • Medical evacuation and repatriation
  • Medical tourism and insurance
  • Medical travel insurance
  • Mental health
  • Micro health insurance
  • Obesity treatment
  • Organ transplants
  • Passive war
  • Political risks
  • Pricing
  • Price regulation
  • Pricing on group schemes
  • Private repatriation
  • Risk management
  • Second medical opinion
  • Security and travel advice
  • Takaful
  • Takaful health
  • Telehealth
  • Term life
  • Top-up covers
  • Trauma
  • Travel insurance
  • Underwriting
  • Virtual doctors
  • War risks
  • Wearables

10. Conclusion

  • Conclusion
  • Database

VOLUME 2 - 129 COMPANY PROFILES

  • Base country
  • HQ
  • Ownership
  • Overview
  • Structure
  • Insurance
  • Healthcare
  • Customer numbers
  • Strategy
  • 2020 results
  • 2021 results
  • 2021 forecasts
  • Buying businesses
  • Selling businesses
  • Failed deals
  • Partnerships
  • Sponsorships
  • Micro health
  • Special products
  • Apps
  • Marketing
  • Technology
  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

Companies Profiled

  • A Plus
  • Abacare
  • Achmea
  • Adelaide
  • ADNIC
  • Aetna
  • Ageas
  • AIA
  • AIG
  • Alan
  • Allegiant Global Partners
  • Alliance Group International
  • Allianz
  • Amariz
  • Amazon
  • Antae
  • Anthem
  • AON
  • Apple
  • APRIL
  • Arabia Insurance
  • Ardonagh
  • Arma Insurance
  • ASSSA
  • Aviva
  • Axa
  • Bahrain National Life
  • Bellwood Prestbury
  • Berkshire Hathaway
  • Blue Cross
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Bupa
  • CCW
  • Centene
  • Chubb
  • CIG Group
  • Cigna
  • Clements Worldwide
  • CMIG International
  • Collinson Group
  • Combined Insurance
  • CVS Health
  • Daman
  • DavidShield
  • DFV
  • Discovery
  • Doha Insurance
  • ERGO
  • Euroins
  • Exclusive Healthcare
  • Expacare
  • Expatriate Group
  • Fairfax
  • Fosun International
  • Freedom Health
  • FWD
  • Gallagher
  • General & Medical
  • Generali
  • GeoBlue
  • Global Benefits Group
  • Global Risk Partners
  • Global Underwriters
  • Globality Health
  • Great Eastern
  • Great West Lifeco
  • Gulf Insurance Group
  • HealthCare International
  • Henner Group
  • Howden
  • Humana
  • IMG
  • Integra Global
  • Irish Life Health
  • Jubilee Holdings
  • JW Seagon
  • Liberty Health
  • Liberty Mutual
  • Lloyd’s of London
  • Lockton
  • Malakoff Humanis
  • Manulife
  • MAPFRE
  • Marsh McLennan
  • Medgulf
  • Medibank
  • Medicover
  • Met Life
  • MGEN
  • Millennium Insurance Brokers
  • Momentum Metropolitan
  • Morgan Price
  • MSH International
  • Munich Re
  • Mutua Madrilena
  • National Life and General
  • New India
  • nib
  • NN Group
  • NowCompare
  • Now Health International
  • Nugent Sante
  • Old Mutual
  • Oman Insurance
  • Orient Insurance
  • Pacific Cross International
  • Pacific Prime
  • Pan-American Life
  • PIB Group
  • PICC
  • Ping An
  • Primary Group
  • PZU
  • QBE
  • QLM
  • RBI Premium
  • Regency Assurance
  • SAICO
  • Sanlam
  • Seguros 360
  • Seven Corners
  • Siaci Saint Honore
  • SiriusPoint
  • Sompo
  • Starr International
  • State Life
  • Status Global
  • Swiss Global
  • Swiss Life
  • SwissCare
  • Tokio Marine
  • Union Insurance
  • UNIQA
  • UnitedHealth
  • VHI
  • Verlingue
  • Vienna Insurance Group
  • Vitality
  • VUMI
  • VYY
  • WAFA Assurance
  • WellAway
  • William Russell
  • Willis Towers Watson
  • Zhong An
  • Zurich Insurance

VOLUME 3 - 176 COUNTRY PROFILES

  • 2021 population
  • 2030 population estimate
  • 2020 UN international migrants IN
  • 2020 UN international migrants OUT
  • 2020 UN refugees
  • Global diaspora
  • Expats in country
  • Healthcare
  • Healthcare for expatriates
  • Healthcare regulators
  • Healthcare regulation
  • Healthcare price regulation
  • State health insurance
  • State health insurance top-up
  • Compulsory health insurance for locals
  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates
  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students
  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors
  • Health insurance for locals overseas
  • Private health insurance
  • Micro health insurance
  • Insurance company and broker regulators
  • Foreign insurance companies
  • Health insurance regulation
  • Health insurance price regulation
  • Countries where expats come from
  • Leading local health insurers
  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers
  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activity

Country Profiles

  • Abu Dhabi
  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Andorra
  • Angola
  • Antigua
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Aruba
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Bermuda
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Bulgaria
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Canada
  • Cayman Islands
  • Chile
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Congo
  • Costa Rica
  • Croatia
  • Cuba
  • Curacao
  • Cyprus
  • Czechia
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Dubai
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • El Salvador
  • Estonia
  • Eswatini
  • Ethiopia
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Ghana
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Grenada
  • Guam
  • Guatemala
  • Guernsey
  • Guinea
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Ivory Coast
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Jersey
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kosovo
  • Kuwait
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Laos
  • Latvia
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Libya
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macau
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Malta
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Nigeria
  • North Macedonia
  • Norway
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Qatar
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Rwanda
  • Saint Kitts And Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sri Lanka
  • St Vincent
  • Sudan
  • Suriname
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Syria
  • Taiwan
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Trinidad And Tobago
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Turks And Caicos
  • UAE
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • Uruguay
  • US Virgin Islands
  • USA
  • Uzbekistan
  • Venezuela
  • Viet Nam
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

How To Buy International Health Insurance (IPMI) 2021

We are selling the report on Research and Markets for £3600 for all 3 volumes. However, if you are an advertiser or iPMI Magazine subscriber, we are offering the report at a reduced price. To take advantage of this offer please complete the form here, or write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com

About The Author

Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

 

 

Read more...

International Health Insurance 2020: The Definitive iPMI Market Report Is Now Available At A Reduced Price

With the brand new #IPMI market research report for 2021 coming out in May 2021, the 2020 edition of the report is now on sale at a subsidized price.

With an RRP of £3600 for all 3 volumes, you can now pick up the complete copy of all 3 volumes for just £1200. For those IPMI market professionals looking at single volumes, they are now available, reduced to just £500 per volume.

Volume 1 Market Overview (230 pages)
Volume 2 Companies (over 500 pages)
Volume 3 Countries (over 600 pages)

BUY NOW: To order this must have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest. Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

iPMI Market Report Overview

There are more opportunities than ever for insurers and brokers to sell health insurance globally to locals and internationals:

  • The global demand for health insurance is rising fast;
  • There are opportunities for health insurers and brokers;
  • The numbers of expatriates are rising and will increase;
  • IPMI and PMI are no longer separate;
  • Locals, students and NGO workers need cover;
  • Many more countries are making health insurance compulsory;
  • Healthcare and health insurance are becoming intertwined;
  • Top up cover and micro health have massive potential;
  • Technology will change how insurers, brokers and customers interact.

International private medical insurance is flourishing. There are more globally mobile individuals than ever before - and employers are building businesses in more diverse countries.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

BUY NOW

To order this must-have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest.

Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

ABOUT iNTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 2020

International private medical insurance (IPMI) was traditionally considered an exclusive health insurance plan for expatriates. Now, the definition of an expatriate is obsolete because more people, including local nationals and expats, regularly travel internationally, due to their lifestyle, income and careers.

These people need international medical insurance irrespective of their national status or residency. Local nationals, expats, and global nomads are driving demand for IPMI products well beyond any residency classification.

The globally mobile population has grown dramatically along with the increased global business. There are 66 million expatriates, and by 2020 this will be 87.5 million. 260 million people now live away from their country of birth and within a decade the total number of expatriate workers and international students will be 100 million.

IPMI as health insurance without borders is the future of health insurance for all people irrespective of their country of nationality, residence or current domicile. The domestic health insurance market is changing and expanding in many markets around the world. Technology, innovation in health treatment and digitisation of processes are also powerful shapers of the future of health insurance.

Compulsory insurance, voluntary top-up covers, differences between what you can sell to locals and expatriates, rules on overseas investors, compulsory local partnerships, economic sanctions, and even local politics are all things that insurers and brokers must understand- as are newer factors of controls on insurance and healthcare prices, and recent compulsory health insurance rules for travellers or students.

There have been several new entrants to the global healthcare insurance and ancillary services market, long dominated by a small handful of existing insurance companies. Regional insurers and brokers are active in the sector.

The focus on wellness and the proactive approach of keeping customers healthy is a key change. The focus is health insurance, not just illness insurance and, proactively engaging with customers to help them lead long and healthy lives.

Technology is changing the market, with access to information and care through mobile applications and innovations such as virtual health, telemedicine and virtual GP services. Data will also drive more accurate underwriting and wellness solutions at an individual customer level. The days of the fully personalised cover are not far off.

IPMI must comply with local laws and regulations and local needs that differ considerably from country to country.

IPMI overview contents

Volume 1

Introduction

  • Overview

  • Growth of need for IPM

  • Health insurance definitions

  • Expatriate definitions

  • Voluntary health insurance

  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate

  • Social and technological disruption

  • Duty of care

  • Why insurers are moving into PMI/IPMI

  • The changing insurance ecosystem

  • Customer centricity

  • Blockchain

  • Emerging markets

  • Belt and Road initiative

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • Asia

  • IPMI must cover more than insurance

  • The future

International health insurance numbers

  • Global premium figures

  • Onshoring and offshoring

  • Premium retention in countries

  • Premiums and local taxes

  • Local partnerships

  • Muddying the waters

  • It is not health insurance

Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance

  • Health insurance market potential

  • Global medical price trends

  • Health insurance pricing trends

  • Global health insurance price and trends

  • Health insurance and universal healthcare

  • Global benefits

  • Digital transformation

Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2018

  • Global healthcare

International health insurance market

  • Buying the market overseas

  • Distribution

  • Healthcare or health insurance

  • History

  • Market potential

  • Hospitals offering health insurance

  • Numbers of insurers

  • Insurance companies

  • Latin American healthcare potential

  • Lloyd’s of London

  • Lloyds’ brokers

  • Managing general agents

  • Third party administrators

  • Insurance brokers

  • Financial advisors

  • Insurance agents

  • Banks

  • Health insurance trade bodies

  • Health insurance comparison sites

  • Micro insurance

  • Mobile devices

  • Self- insurance

  • Smart phones

  • Social media

  • Videos

International health insurance products

  • Cover

  • International insurance versus domestic insurance

  • IPMI in 2019

Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures

  • Global number of expatriates

  • Global population

  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees

  • Global mobility

  • Expatriate population as % of worldwide population

  • Expatriate or international migrant

  • Refugees and expatriates

  • International students

  • Migrant workers

  • Cross border workers

  • Diasporas

  • Migration and health

Customers

  • Target markets for insurers

  • What is an expatriate?

  • Expatriate characteristics

  • Expatriate salaries and benefits

  • Buyers

  • Dependants

  • Emerging markets middle class

  • Generation Y

  • More than one product

  • High net worth

  • How people choose international health insurance

  • Indian companies

  • Maritime

  • Mining

  • Music industry

  • NGOs

  • Need

  • Oil and gas

  • Overseas employees need support

  • Questions potential customers ask

  • Retirees

  • Self-employed

  • Short assignments

  • Short-term cover

  • Singles

  • Students

  • Target ages

  • Teachers

  • Wealthy expatriates

  • Who can be covered?

  • Why companies buy it

  • Why individuals buy it

  • Why needs are changing

  • Why not just buy cover locally

  • Women

The product

  • Addiction treatment

  • Admitted policies

  • Apps

  • Big data

  • Budget covers

  • Cancer

  • Chatbots

  • Choice of cover or set packages

  • Claims

  • Compliance with local law

  • Co-payments

  • Critical illness

  • Currency

  • Danger zones

  • Diabetes treatment

  • Diaspora insurance

  • Duty of care

  • Emergency assistance

  • Emergency evacuation

  • European Air Medical Institute

  • Fertility treatment

  • Fraud

  • Funeral plans

  • Global cover

  • Helplines

  • Income protection

  • Insurers rethink of health insurance

  • International medical accreditation

  • Medical evacuation and repatriation

  • Medical tourism and insurance

  • Medical travel insurance

  • Mental health

  • Micro health insurance

  • Obesity treatment

  • Organ transplants

  • Passive war

  • Political risks

  • Pricing

  • Price regulation

  • Pricing on group schemes

  • Private repatriation

  • Risk management

  • Second medical opinion

  • Security and travel advice

  • Takaful

  • Takaful health

  • Telehealth

  • Term life

  • Top up covers

  • Travel insurance

  • Underwriting

  • Virtual doctors

  • War risks

  • Wearables

Volume 2 Companies

National, regional and local insurers and brokers

  • Base country

  • HQ

  • Ownership

  • Overview

  • Structure

  • Insurance

  • Healthcare

  • Customer numbers

  • Strategy

  • 2018 results

  • 2019 forecasts

  • Buying businesses

  • Selling businesses

  • Failed deals

  • Partnerships

  • Sponsorships

  • Micro health

  • Products

  • Apps

  • Marketing

  • Technology

  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

  • Countries A to Z

Company profiles

  • A Plus

  • Abacare

  • Achmea

  • ADNIC

  • AIA

  • AIG

  • Aetna

  • Ageas

  • Alan

  • Allegiant

  • Alliance Group

  • Allianz

  • Amariz

  • Amazon

  • Anbang

  • Antae

  • Anthem

  • AON

  • Apple

  • APRIL

  • Ardonagh

  • ASSSA

  • Aviva

  • AXA

  • Bellwood Prestbury

  • Berkshire Hathaway

  • Blue Cross

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Bupa

  • CCW

  • Chubb

  • Cigna

  • Clements Worldwide

  • CM International

  • Collinson

  • CXA

  • DFV

  • Daman

  • DavidShield

  • Discovery

  • Doha Insurance

  • Exclusive Healthcare

  • Expacare

  • Expatriate Group

  • Fairfax

  • Fosun

  • Freedom Health

  • Gallagher

  • General & Medical

  • Generali

  • Global Benefits

  • Global Underwriters

  • Great West Lifeco

  • Gulf Insurance Group

  • Haven Healthcare

  • Healix

  • HealthCare International

  • Henner

  • Humana

  • Integra Global

  • Jubilee

  • LAMP

  • Liberty Mutual

  • Lloyds

  • Lockton

  • Malakoff Médéric Humanis

  • MAPFRE

  • Marsh McLennan

  • Medgulf

  • Medibank

  • Medicover

  • Met Life

  • MMI

  • Morgan Price

  • Munich

  • Mutua Madrilena

  • National Life and General

  • New India

  • nib

  • NN Group

  • Now Health International

  • Nugent Sante

  • Old Mutual

  • Oman Insurance

  • Pacific Cross

  • Pacific Prime

  • Pan-American Life

  • Premier Group

  • Primary Group

  • Punter Southall

  • Qatar Insurance

  • QBE

  • RBI Premium

  • Regency Assurance

  • Saham

  • Saico

  • JW Seagon

  • Seven Corners

  • Siaci Saint Honore

  • Sompo

  • Starr

  • State Life

  • Status Global

  • Swiss Global

  • Swiss Life

  • Tokio Marine

  • UnitedHealth

  • Union Insurance

  • Vienna Insurance

  • WAFA

  • William Russell

  • Willis

  • Zhong An

  • Zurich

Volume 3 countries

Country profiles look at:

* Healthcare, healthcare reforms and price controls

* State health insurance and planned reform

* Compulsory health and travel health insurance and planned reforms

* Private health insurance and supplementary covers

* Health insurance regulation and planned reform

* Health insurance price regulation and planned reform

* Specific data and requirements for expats

COUNTRY PROFILES

  • Healthcare

  • Healthcare for expatriates

  • Healthcare regulators

  • Healthcare regulation

  • Healthcare price regulation

  • State health insurance

  • State health insurance top up

  • Compulsory health insurance for locals

  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates

  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students

  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors

  • Health insurance for locals overseas

  • Private health insurance

  • Insurance company and broker regulators

  • Health insurance regulation

  • Health insurance price regulation

  • 2019 population

  • 2030 population estimate

  • UN 2017 number of international immigrants- inbound

  • UN 2017 number of international emigrants- outbound

  • UN numbers of refugees

  • Local figures on expatriate numbers

  • Local figures on expatriate sources

  • Local figures on Diaspora

  • Leading local health insurers

  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers

  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activities

COUNTRIES

  • Abu Dhabi

  • Afghanistan

  • Albania

  • Algeria

  • Andorra

  • Angola

  • Antigua

  • Argentina

  • Armenia

  • Australia

  • Austria

  • Azerbaijan

  • Bahamas

  • Bahrain

  • Bangladesh

  • Barbados

  • Belarus

  • Belgium

  • Belize

  • Bermuda

  • Bolivia

  • Bosnia

  • Botswana

  • Brazil

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Brunei Darussalam

  • Bulgaria

  • Burkina Faso

  • Burundi

  • Cambodia

  • Canada

  • Cayman Islands

  • Chile

  • China

  • Colombia

  • Costa Rica

  • Croatia

  • Cuba

  • Curacao

  • Cyprus

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Dubai

  • Ecuador

  • Egypt

  • Estonia

  • Ethiopia

  • Fiji

  • Finland

  • France

  • Georgia

  • Germany

  • Ghana

  • Gibraltar

  • Greece

  • Grenada

  • Guatemala

  • Guernsey

  • Guyana

  • Honduras

  • Hong Kong

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Iran

  • Iraq

  • Ireland

  • Israel

  • Italy

  • Jamaica

  • Japan

  • Jersey

  • Jordan

  • Kazakhstan

  • Kenya

  • Kuwait

  • Kyrgyzstan

  • Latvia

  • Lebanon

  • Lesotho

  • Libya

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Macau

  • Macedonia

  • Malawi

  • Malaysia

  • Maldives

  • Malta

  • Mauritius

  • Mexico

  • Moldova

  • Monaco

  • Mongolia

  • Montenegro

  • Morocco

  • Mozambique

  • Myanmar

  • Nepal

  • Netherlands

  • New Zealand

  • Nicaragua

  • Nigeria

  • Norway

  • Oman

  • Pakistan

  • Panama

  • Papua New Guinea

  • Paraguay

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Puerto Rico

  • Qatar

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • Rwanda

  • Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • Saudi Arabia

  • Serbia

  • Sierra Leone

  • Singapore

  • Slovak Republic

  • Slovenia

  • Somalia

  • South Africa

  • South Korea

  • Spain

  • Sri Lanka

  • Sudan

  • Swaziland

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

  • Syria

  • Taiwan

  • Tanzania

  • Thailand

  • Trinidad And Tobago

  • Tunisia

  • Turkey

  • Turks And Caicos

  • Uganda

  • Ukraine

  • United Arab Emirates

  • United Kingdom

  • Usa

  • Uruguay

  • Venezuela

  • Vietnam

  • Yemen

  • Zambia

  • Zimbabwe

 

Read more...

iPMIM Advertisers Save Over 55% On New iPMI Report - Subscribers Save Over 45%

Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, iPMI Magazine has negotiated a business support program with the report author, when you purchase all 3 volumes of the report, with the following largely reduced price available until 30/9/2020.

iPMI Magazine advertisers and subscribers enjoy complete access to ALL 3 VOLUMES of International Health Insurance 2020 at a specially negotiated reduced price.

Click here to access the report at the reduced investment.

ABOUT iNTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 2020

International private medical insurance (IPMI) was traditionally considered an exclusive health insurance plan for expatriates. Now, the definition of an expatriate is obsolete because more people, including local nationals and expats, regularly travel internationally, due to their lifestyle, income and careers.

These people need international medical insurance irrespective of their national status or residency. Local nationals, expats, and global nomads are driving demand for IPMI products well beyond any residency classification.

The globally mobile population has grown dramatically along with the increased global business. There are 66 million expatriates, and by 2020 this will be 87.5 million. 260 million people now live away from their country of birth and within a decade the total number of expatriate workers and international students will be 100 million.

IPMI as health insurance without borders is the future of health insurance for all people irrespective of their country of nationality, residence or current domicile. The domestic health insurance market is changing and expanding in many markets around the world. Technology, innovation in health treatment and digitisation of processes are also powerful shapers of the future of health insurance.

Compulsory insurance, voluntary top-up covers, differences between what you can sell to locals and expatriates, rules on overseas investors, compulsory local partnerships, economic sanctions, and even local politics are all things that insurers and brokers must understand- as are newer factors of controls on insurance and healthcare prices, and recent compulsory health insurance rules for travellers or students.

There have been several new entrants to the global healthcare insurance and ancillary services market, long dominated by a small handful of existing insurance companies. Regional insurers and brokers are active in the sector.

The focus on wellness and the proactive approach of keeping customers healthy is a key change. The focus is health insurance, not just illness insurance and, proactively engaging with customers to help them lead long and healthy lives.

Technology is changing the market, with access to information and care through mobile applications and innovations such as virtual health, telemedicine and virtual GP services. Data will also drive more accurate underwriting and wellness solutions at an individual customer level. The days of the fully personalised cover are not far off.

IPMI must comply with local laws and regulations and local needs that differ considerably from country to country.

IPMI overview contents

Volume 1

Introduction

  • Overview

  • Growth of need for IPM

  • Health insurance definitions

  • Expatriate definitions

  • Voluntary health insurance

  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate

  • Social and technological disruption

  • Duty of care

  • Why insurers are moving into PMI/IPMI

  • The changing insurance ecosystem

  • Customer centricity

  • Blockchain

  • Emerging markets

  • Belt and Road initiative

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • Asia

  • IPMI must cover more than insurance

  • The future

International health insurance numbers

  • Global premium figures

  • Onshoring and offshoring

  • Premium retention in countries

  • Premiums and local taxes

  • Local partnerships

  • Muddying the waters

  • It is not health insurance

Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance

  • Health insurance market potential

  • Global medical price trends

  • Health insurance pricing trends

  • Global health insurance price and trends

  • Health insurance and universal healthcare

  • Global benefits

  • Digital transformation

Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2018

  • Global healthcare

International health insurance market

  • Buying the market overseas

  • Distribution

  • Healthcare or health insurance

  • History

  • Market potential

  • Hospitals offering health insurance

  • Numbers of insurers

  • Insurance companies

  • Latin American healthcare potential

  • Lloyd’s of London

  • Lloyds’ brokers

  • Managing general agents

  • Third party administrators

  • Insurance brokers

  • Financial advisors

  • Insurance agents

  • Banks

  • Health insurance trade bodies

  • Health insurance comparison sites

  • Micro insurance

  • Mobile devices

  • Self- insurance

  • Smart phones

  • Social media

  • Videos

International health insurance products

  • Cover

  • International insurance versus domestic insurance

  • IPMI in 2019

Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures

  • Global number of expatriates

  • Global population

  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees

  • Global mobility

  • Expatriate population as % of worldwide population

  • Expatriate or international migrant

  • Refugees and expatriates

  • International students

  • Migrant workers

  • Cross border workers

  • Diasporas

  • Migration and health

Customers

  • Target markets for insurers

  • What is an expatriate?

  • Expatriate characteristics

  • Expatriate salaries and benefits

  • Buyers

  • Dependants

  • Emerging markets middle class

  • Generation Y

  • More than one product

  • High net worth

  • How people choose international health insurance

  • Indian companies

  • Maritime

  • Mining

  • Music industry

  • NGOs

  • Need

  • Oil and gas

  • Overseas employees need support

  • Questions potential customers ask

  • Retirees

  • Self-employed

  • Short assignments

  • Short-term cover

  • Singles

  • Students

  • Target ages

  • Teachers

  • Wealthy expatriates

  • Who can be covered?

  • Why companies buy it

  • Why individuals buy it

  • Why needs are changing

  • Why not just buy cover locally

  • Women

The product

  • Addiction treatment

  • Admitted policies

  • Apps

  • Big data

  • Budget covers

  • Cancer

  • Chatbots

  • Choice of cover or set packages

  • Claims

  • Compliance with local law

  • Co-payments

  • Critical illness

  • Currency

  • Danger zones

  • Diabetes treatment

  • Diaspora insurance

  • Duty of care

  • Emergency assistance

  • Emergency evacuation

  • European Air Medical Institute

  • Fertility treatment

  • Fraud

  • Funeral plans

  • Global cover

  • Helplines

  • Income protection

  • Insurers rethink of health insurance

  • International medical accreditation

  • Medical evacuation and repatriation

  • Medical tourism and insurance

  • Medical travel insurance

  • Mental health

  • Micro health insurance

  • Obesity treatment

  • Organ transplants

  • Passive war

  • Political risks

  • Pricing

  • Price regulation

  • Pricing on group schemes

  • Private repatriation

  • Risk management

  • Second medical opinion

  • Security and travel advice

  • Takaful

  • Takaful health

  • Telehealth

  • Term life

  • Top up covers

  • Travel insurance

  • Underwriting

  • Virtual doctors

  • War risks

  • Wearables

Volume 2 Companies

National, regional and local insurers and brokers

  • Base country

  • HQ

  • Ownership

  • Overview

  • Structure

  • Insurance

  • Healthcare

  • Customer numbers

  • Strategy

  • 2018 results

  • 2019 forecasts

  • Buying businesses

  • Selling businesses

  • Failed deals

  • Partnerships

  • Sponsorships

  • Micro health

  • Products

  • Apps

  • Marketing

  • Technology

  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

  • Countries A to Z

Company profiles

  • A Plus

  • Abacare

  • Achmea

  • ADNIC

  • AIA

  • AIG

  • Aetna

  • Ageas

  • Alan

  • Allegiant

  • Alliance Group

  • Allianz

  • Amariz

  • Amazon

  • Anbang

  • Antae

  • Anthem

  • AON

  • Apple

  • APRIL

  • Ardonagh

  • ASSSA

  • Aviva

  • AXA

  • Bellwood Prestbury

  • Berkshire Hathaway

  • Blue Cross

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Bupa

  • CCW

  • Chubb

  • Cigna

  • Clements Worldwide

  • CM International

  • Collinson

  • CXA

  • DFV

  • Daman

  • DavidShield

  • Discovery

  • Doha Insurance

  • Exclusive Healthcare

  • Expacare

  • Expatriate Group

  • Fairfax

  • Fosun

  • Freedom Health

  • Gallagher

  • General & Medical

  • Generali

  • Global Benefits

  • Global Underwriters

  • Great West Lifeco

  • Gulf Insurance Group

  • Haven Healthcare

  • Healix

  • HealthCare International

  • Henner

  • Humana

  • Integra Global

  • Jubilee

  • LAMP

  • Liberty Mutual

  • Lloyds

  • Lockton

  • Malakoff Médéric Humanis

  • MAPFRE

  • Marsh McLennan

  • Medgulf

  • Medibank

  • Medicover

  • Met Life

  • MMI

  • Morgan Price

  • Munich

  • Mutua Madrilena

  • National Life and General

  • New India

  • nib

  • NN Group

  • Now Health International

  • Nugent Sante

  • Old Mutual

  • Oman Insurance

  • Pacific Cross

  • Pacific Prime

  • Pan-American Life

  • Premier Group

  • Primary Group

  • Punter Southall

  • Qatar Insurance

  • QBE

  • RBI Premium

  • Regency Assurance

  • Saham

  • Saico

  • JW Seagon

  • Seven Corners

  • Siaci Saint Honore

  • Sompo

  • Starr

  • State Life

  • Status Global

  • Swiss Global

  • Swiss Life

  • Tokio Marine

  • UnitedHealth

  • Union Insurance

  • Vienna Insurance

  • WAFA

  • William Russell

  • Willis

  • Zhong An

  • Zurich

Volume 3 countries

Country profiles look at:

* Healthcare, healthcare reforms and price controls

* State health insurance and planned reform

* Compulsory health and travel health insurance and planned reforms

* Private health insurance and supplementary covers

* Health insurance regulation and planned reform

* Health insurance price regulation and planned reform

* Specific data and requirements for expats

COUNTRY PROFILES

  • Healthcare

  • Healthcare for expatriates

  • Healthcare regulators

  • Healthcare regulation

  • Healthcare price regulation

  • State health insurance

  • State health insurance top up

  • Compulsory health insurance for locals

  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates

  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students

  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors

  • Health insurance for locals overseas

  • Private health insurance

  • Insurance company and broker regulators

  • Health insurance regulation

  • Health insurance price regulation

  • 2019 population

  • 2030 population estimate

  • UN 2017 number of international immigrants- inbound

  • UN 2017 number of international emigrants- outbound

  • UN numbers of refugees

  • Local figures on expatriate numbers

  • Local figures on expatriate sources

  • Local figures on Diaspora

  • Leading local health insurers

  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers

  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activities

COUNTRIES

  • Abu Dhabi

  • Afghanistan

  • Albania

  • Algeria

  • Andorra

  • Angola

  • Antigua

  • Argentina

  • Armenia

  • Australia

  • Austria

  • Azerbaijan

  • Bahamas

  • Bahrain

  • Bangladesh

  • Barbados

  • Belarus

  • Belgium

  • Belize

  • Bermuda

  • Bolivia

  • Bosnia

  • Botswana

  • Brazil

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Brunei Darussalam

  • Bulgaria

  • Burkina Faso

  • Burundi

  • Cambodia

  • Canada

  • Cayman Islands

  • Chile

  • China

  • Colombia

  • Costa Rica

  • Croatia

  • Cuba

  • Curacao

  • Cyprus

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Dubai

  • Ecuador

  • Egypt

  • Estonia

  • Ethiopia

  • Fiji

  • Finland

  • France

  • Georgia

  • Germany

  • Ghana

  • Gibraltar

  • Greece

  • Grenada

  • Guatemala

  • Guernsey

  • Guyana

  • Honduras

  • Hong Kong

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Iran

  • Iraq

  • Ireland

  • Israel

  • Italy

  • Jamaica

  • Japan

  • Jersey

  • Jordan

  • Kazakhstan

  • Kenya

  • Kuwait

  • Kyrgyzstan

  • Latvia

  • Lebanon

  • Lesotho

  • Libya

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Macau

  • Macedonia

  • Malawi

  • Malaysia

  • Maldives

  • Malta

  • Mauritius

  • Mexico

  • Moldova

  • Monaco

  • Mongolia

  • Montenegro

  • Morocco

  • Mozambique

  • Myanmar

  • Nepal

  • Netherlands

  • New Zealand

  • Nicaragua

  • Nigeria

  • Norway

  • Oman

  • Pakistan

  • Panama

  • Papua New Guinea

  • Paraguay

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Puerto Rico

  • Qatar

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • Rwanda

  • Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • Saudi Arabia

  • Serbia

  • Sierra Leone

  • Singapore

  • Slovak Republic

  • Slovenia

  • Somalia

  • South Africa

  • South Korea

  • Spain

  • Sri Lanka

  • Sudan

  • Swaziland

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

  • Syria

  • Taiwan

  • Tanzania

  • Thailand

  • Trinidad And Tobago

  • Tunisia

  • Turkey

  • Turks And Caicos

  • Uganda

  • Ukraine

  • United Arab Emirates

  • United Kingdom

  • Usa

  • Uruguay

  • Venezuela

  • Vietnam

  • Yemen

  • Zambia

  • Zimbabwe

Read more...

International Health Insurance 2020: The Definitive iPMI Market Report Is Out Now

Leading international private medical insurance publisher iPMI Magazine is excited to announce the launch of “International Health Insurance 2020" - International Health Insurance for Expats, High Net Worth Individuals, 3rd Country Nationals, Domestic Nationals and Global Nomads.

There are more opportunities than ever for insurers and brokers to sell health insurance globally to locals and internationals.

  • The global demand for health insurance is rising fast;
  • There are opportunities for health insurers and brokers;
  • The numbers of expatriates are rising and will increase;
  • IPMI and PMI are no longer separate;
  • Locals, students and NGO workers need cover;
  • Many more countries are making health insurance compulsory;
  • Healthcare and health insurance are becoming intertwined;
  • Top up cover and micro health have massive potential;
  • Technology will change how insurers, brokers and customers interact.

International private medical insurance is flourishing. There are more globally mobile individuals than ever before - and employers are building businesses in more diverse countries.

Volume 1 Market Overview: (230 pages)
Volume 2 Companies: (over 500 pages)
Volume 3 Countries: (over 600 pages)

PRICING*

iPMI Magazine advertisers and subscribers enjoy complete access to ALL 3 VOLUMES of International Health Insurance 2020 at a specially negotiated reduced price. Other retailers are charging £3600 for all 3 volumes and £1400 for individual volumes.

Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, iPMI Magazine has negotiated a business support program with the report author, when you purchase all 3 volumes of the report, with the following largely reduced price available until 30/9/2020:

*This exclusive pricing offer is only available until 31/7/2020 and when you purchase this report via iPMI Magazine.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

BUY NOW

To order this must-have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest.

Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

ABOUT iNTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 2020

International private medical insurance (IPMI) was traditionally considered an exclusive health insurance plan for expatriates. Now, the definition of an expatriate is obsolete because more people, including local nationals and expats, regularly travel internationally, due to their lifestyle, income and careers.

These people need international medical insurance irrespective of their national status or residency. Local nationals, expats, and global nomads are driving demand for IPMI products well beyond any residency classification.

The globally mobile population has grown dramatically along with the increased global business. There are 66 million expatriates, and by 2020 this will be 87.5 million. 260 million people now live away from their country of birth and within a decade the total number of expatriate workers and international students will be 100 million.

IPMI as health insurance without borders is the future of health insurance for all people irrespective of their country of nationality, residence or current domicile. The domestic health insurance market is changing and expanding in many markets around the world. Technology, innovation in health treatment and digitisation of processes are also powerful shapers of the future of health insurance.

Compulsory insurance, voluntary top-up covers, differences between what you can sell to locals and expatriates, rules on overseas investors, compulsory local partnerships, economic sanctions, and even local politics are all things that insurers and brokers must understand- as are newer factors of controls on insurance and healthcare prices, and recent compulsory health insurance rules for travellers or students.

There have been several new entrants to the global healthcare insurance and ancillary services market, long dominated by a small handful of existing insurance companies. Regional insurers and brokers are active in the sector.

The focus on wellness and the proactive approach of keeping customers healthy is a key change. The focus is health insurance, not just illness insurance and, proactively engaging with customers to help them lead long and healthy lives.

Technology is changing the market, with access to information and care through mobile applications and innovations such as virtual health, telemedicine and virtual GP services. Data will also drive more accurate underwriting and wellness solutions at an individual customer level. The days of the fully personalised cover are not far off.

IPMI must comply with local laws and regulations and local needs that differ considerably from country to country.

IPMI overview contents

Volume 1

Introduction

  • Overview

  • Growth of need for IPM

  • Health insurance definitions

  • Expatriate definitions

  • Voluntary health insurance

  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate

  • Social and technological disruption

  • Duty of care

  • Why insurers are moving into PMI/IPMI

  • The changing insurance ecosystem

  • Customer centricity

  • Blockchain

  • Emerging markets

  • Belt and Road initiative

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • Asia

  • IPMI must cover more than insurance

  • The future

International health insurance numbers

  • Global premium figures

  • Onshoring and offshoring

  • Premium retention in countries

  • Premiums and local taxes

  • Local partnerships

  • Muddying the waters

  • It is not health insurance

Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance

  • Health insurance market potential

  • Global medical price trends

  • Health insurance pricing trends

  • Global health insurance price and trends

  • Health insurance and universal healthcare

  • Global benefits

  • Digital transformation

Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2018

  • Global healthcare

International health insurance market

  • Buying the market overseas

  • Distribution

  • Healthcare or health insurance

  • History

  • Market potential

  • Hospitals offering health insurance

  • Numbers of insurers

  • Insurance companies

  • Latin American healthcare potential

  • Lloyd’s of London

  • Lloyds’ brokers

  • Managing general agents

  • Third party administrators

  • Insurance brokers

  • Financial advisors

  • Insurance agents

  • Banks

  • Health insurance trade bodies

  • Health insurance comparison sites

  • Micro insurance

  • Mobile devices

  • Self- insurance

  • Smart phones

  • Social media

  • Videos

International health insurance products

  • Cover

  • International insurance versus domestic insurance

  • IPMI in 2019

Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures

  • Global number of expatriates

  • Global population

  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees

  • Global mobility

  • Expatriate population as % of worldwide population

  • Expatriate or international migrant

  • Refugees and expatriates

  • International students

  • Migrant workers

  • Cross border workers

  • Diasporas

  • Migration and health

Customers

  • Target markets for insurers

  • What is an expatriate?

  • Expatriate characteristics

  • Expatriate salaries and benefits

  • Buyers

  • Dependants

  • Emerging markets middle class

  • Generation Y

  • More than one product

  • High net worth

  • How people choose international health insurance

  • Indian companies

  • Maritime

  • Mining

  • Music industry

  • NGOs

  • Need

  • Oil and gas

  • Overseas employees need support

  • Questions potential customers ask

  • Retirees

  • Self-employed

  • Short assignments

  • Short-term cover

  • Singles

  • Students

  • Target ages

  • Teachers

  • Wealthy expatriates

  • Who can be covered?

  • Why companies buy it

  • Why individuals buy it

  • Why needs are changing

  • Why not just buy cover locally

  • Women

The product

  • Addiction treatment

  • Admitted policies

  • Apps

  • Big data

  • Budget covers

  • Cancer

  • Chatbots

  • Choice of cover or set packages

  • Claims

  • Compliance with local law

  • Co-payments

  • Critical illness

  • Currency

  • Danger zones

  • Diabetes treatment

  • Diaspora insurance

  • Duty of care

  • Emergency assistance

  • Emergency evacuation

  • European Air Medical Institute

  • Fertility treatment

  • Fraud

  • Funeral plans

  • Global cover

  • Helplines

  • Income protection

  • Insurers rethink of health insurance

  • International medical accreditation

  • Medical evacuation and repatriation

  • Medical tourism and insurance

  • Medical travel insurance

  • Mental health

  • Micro health insurance

  • Obesity treatment

  • Organ transplants

  • Passive war

  • Political risks

  • Pricing

  • Price regulation

  • Pricing on group schemes

  • Private repatriation

  • Risk management

  • Second medical opinion

  • Security and travel advice

  • Takaful

  • Takaful health

  • Telehealth

  • Term life

  • Top up covers

  • Travel insurance

  • Underwriting

  • Virtual doctors

  • War risks

  • Wearables

Volume 2 Companies

National, regional and local insurers and brokers

  • Base country

  • HQ

  • Ownership

  • Overview

  • Structure

  • Insurance

  • Healthcare

  • Customer numbers

  • Strategy

  • 2018 results

  • 2019 forecasts

  • Buying businesses

  • Selling businesses

  • Failed deals

  • Partnerships

  • Sponsorships

  • Micro health

  • Products

  • Apps

  • Marketing

  • Technology

  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

  • Countries A to Z

Company profiles

  • A Plus

  • Abacare

  • Achmea

  • ADNIC

  • AIA

  • AIG

  • Aetna

  • Ageas

  • Alan

  • Allegiant

  • Alliance Group

  • Allianz

  • Amariz

  • Amazon

  • Anbang

  • Antae

  • Anthem

  • AON

  • Apple

  • APRIL

  • Ardonagh

  • ASSSA

  • Aviva

  • AXA

  • Bellwood Prestbury

  • Berkshire Hathaway

  • Blue Cross

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Bupa

  • CCW

  • Chubb

  • Cigna

  • Clements Worldwide

  • CM International

  • Collinson

  • CXA

  • DFV

  • Daman

  • DavidShield

  • Discovery

  • Doha Insurance

  • Exclusive Healthcare

  • Expacare

  • Expatriate Group

  • Fairfax

  • Fosun

  • Freedom Health

  • Gallagher

  • General & Medical

  • Generali

  • Global Benefits

  • Global Underwriters

  • Great West Lifeco

  • Gulf Insurance Group

  • Haven Healthcare

  • Healix

  • HealthCare International

  • Henner

  • Humana

  • Integra Global

  • Jubilee

  • LAMP

  • Liberty Mutual

  • Lloyds

  • Lockton

  • Malakoff Médéric Humanis

  • MAPFRE

  • Marsh McLennan

  • Medgulf

  • Medibank

  • Medicover

  • Met Life

  • MMI

  • Morgan Price

  • Munich

  • Mutua Madrilena

  • National Life and General

  • New India

  • nib

  • NN Group

  • Now Health International

  • Nugent Sante

  • Old Mutual

  • Oman Insurance

  • Pacific Cross

  • Pacific Prime

  • Pan-American Life

  • Premier Group

  • Primary Group

  • Punter Southall

  • Qatar Insurance

  • QBE

  • RBI Premium

  • Regency Assurance

  • Saham

  • Saico

  • JW Seagon

  • Seven Corners

  • Siaci Saint Honore

  • Sompo

  • Starr

  • State Life

  • Status Global

  • Swiss Global

  • Swiss Life

  • Tokio Marine

  • UnitedHealth

  • Union Insurance

  • Vienna Insurance

  • WAFA

  • William Russell

  • Willis

  • Zhong An

  • Zurich

Volume 3 countries

Country profiles look at:

* Healthcare, healthcare reforms and price controls

* State health insurance and planned reform

* Compulsory health and travel health insurance and planned reforms

* Private health insurance and supplementary covers

* Health insurance regulation and planned reform

* Health insurance price regulation and planned reform

* Specific data and requirements for expats

COUNTRY PROFILES

  • Healthcare

  • Healthcare for expatriates

  • Healthcare regulators

  • Healthcare regulation

  • Healthcare price regulation

  • State health insurance

  • State health insurance top up

  • Compulsory health insurance for locals

  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates

  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students

  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors

  • Health insurance for locals overseas

  • Private health insurance

  • Insurance company and broker regulators

  • Health insurance regulation

  • Health insurance price regulation

  • 2019 population

  • 2030 population estimate

  • UN 2017 number of international immigrants- inbound

  • UN 2017 number of international emigrants- outbound

  • UN numbers of refugees

  • Local figures on expatriate numbers

  • Local figures on expatriate sources

  • Local figures on Diaspora

  • Leading local health insurers

  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers

  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activities

COUNTRIES

  • Abu Dhabi

  • Afghanistan

  • Albania

  • Algeria

  • Andorra

  • Angola

  • Antigua

  • Argentina

  • Armenia

  • Australia

  • Austria

  • Azerbaijan

  • Bahamas

  • Bahrain

  • Bangladesh

  • Barbados

  • Belarus

  • Belgium

  • Belize

  • Bermuda

  • Bolivia

  • Bosnia

  • Botswana

  • Brazil

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Brunei Darussalam

  • Bulgaria

  • Burkina Faso

  • Burundi

  • Cambodia

  • Canada

  • Cayman Islands

  • Chile

  • China

  • Colombia

  • Costa Rica

  • Croatia

  • Cuba

  • Curacao

  • Cyprus

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Dubai

  • Ecuador

  • Egypt

  • Estonia

  • Ethiopia

  • Fiji

  • Finland

  • France

  • Georgia

  • Germany

  • Ghana

  • Gibraltar

  • Greece

  • Grenada

  • Guatemala

  • Guernsey

  • Guyana

  • Honduras

  • Hong Kong

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Iran

  • Iraq

  • Ireland

  • Israel

  • Italy

  • Jamaica

  • Japan

  • Jersey

  • Jordan

  • Kazakhstan

  • Kenya

  • Kuwait

  • Kyrgyzstan

  • Latvia

  • Lebanon

  • Lesotho

  • Libya

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Macau

  • Macedonia

  • Malawi

  • Malaysia

  • Maldives

  • Malta

  • Mauritius

  • Mexico

  • Moldova

  • Monaco

  • Mongolia

  • Montenegro

  • Morocco

  • Mozambique

  • Myanmar

  • Nepal

  • Netherlands

  • New Zealand

  • Nicaragua

  • Nigeria

  • Norway

  • Oman

  • Pakistan

  • Panama

  • Papua New Guinea

  • Paraguay

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Puerto Rico

  • Qatar

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • Rwanda

  • Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • Saudi Arabia

  • Serbia

  • Sierra Leone

  • Singapore

  • Slovak Republic

  • Slovenia

  • Somalia

  • South Africa

  • South Korea

  • Spain

  • Sri Lanka

  • Sudan

  • Swaziland

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

  • Syria

  • Taiwan

  • Tanzania

  • Thailand

  • Trinidad And Tobago

  • Tunisia

  • Turkey

  • Turks And Caicos

  • Uganda

  • Ukraine

  • United Arab Emirates

  • United Kingdom

  • Usa

  • Uruguay

  • Venezuela

  • Vietnam

  • Yemen

  • Zambia

  • Zimbabwe

BUY NOW: To order this must have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest. Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

Read more...

Last Chance To Purchase IPMI Report International Health Insurance 2019 Before Price Increase

iPMI Magazine advertisers and subscribers enjoy complete access to ALL 3 VOLUMES of the brand new IPMI report International Health Insurance 2019 at a specially negotiated reduced price. Other retailers like Research and Markets are charging £3600 for all 3 volumes and £1400 for individual volumes.

Leading international private medical insurance publisher iPMI Magazine is excited to announce the launch of “International Health Insurance 2019 - International Health Insurance for Expats, High Net Worth Individuals, 3rd Country Nationals, Domestic Nationals and Global Nomads: Volume 1, 2 and 3. 

There are more opportunities than ever for insurers and brokers to sell health insurance globally to locals and internationals.

  • The global demand for health insurance is rising fast;
  • There are opportunities for health insurers and brokers;
  • The numbers of expatriates are rising and will increase;
  • IPMI and PMI are no longer separate;
  • Locals, students and NGO workers need cover;
  • Many more countries are making health insurance compulsory;
  • Healthcare and health insurance are becoming intertwined;
  • Top up cover and micro health have massive potential;
  • Technology will change how insurers, brokers and customers interact.

International private medical insurance is flourishing. There are more globally mobile individuals than ever before - and employers are building businesses in more diverse countries.

Volume 1 Market Overview: April 2019 (230 pages)
Volume 2 Companies: Available July 2019 - 133 company profiles (over 500 pages)
Volume 3 Countries: Available September 2019 - 180 country profiles (over 600 pages)

PRICING: iPMI Magazine advertisers and subscribers enjoy complete access to ALL 3 VOLUMES of International Health Insurance 2019 at a specially negotiated reduced price*. Other retailers are charging £3600 for all 3 volumes and £1400 for individual volumes.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

REPORT PRICE COMPARISON: To view International Health Insurance 2019 on Research and Markets and compare their price VS the price at iPMI Magazine please click here.

BUY NOW: To order this must have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest. Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

*This offer is only available when you purchase this report via iPMI Magazine. 

RELATED IPMI MAGAZINE READING: Understanding PMI And IPMI Market Size Per Country

ABOUT iNTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 2019

International private medical insurance (IPMI) was traditionally considered an exclusive health insurance plan for expatriates. Now, the definition of an expatriate is obsolete because more people, including local nationals and expats, regularly travel internationally, due to their lifestyle, income and careers.

These people need international medical insurance irrespective of their national status or residency. Local nationals, expats, and global nomads are driving demand for IPMI products well beyond any residency classification.

The globally mobile population has grown dramatically along with the increased global business. There are 66 million expatriates, and by 2020 this will be 87.5 million. 260 million people now live away from their country of birth and within a decade the total number of expatriate workers and international students will be 100 million.

IPMI as health insurance without borders is the future of health insurance for all people irrespective of their country of nationality, residence or current domicile. The domestic health insurance market is changing and expanding in many markets around the world. Technology, innovation in health treatment and digitisation of processes are also powerful shapers of the future of health insurance.

Compulsory insurance, voluntary top-up covers, differences between what you can sell to locals and expatriates, rules on overseas investors, compulsory local partnerships, economic sanctions, and even local politics are all things that insurers and brokers must understand- as are newer factors of controls on insurance and healthcare prices, and recent compulsory health insurance rules for travellers or students.

There have been several new entrants to the global healthcare insurance and ancillary services market, long dominated by a small handful of existing insurance companies. Regional insurers and brokers are active in the sector.

The focus on wellness and the proactive approach of keeping customers healthy is a key change. The focus is health insurance, not just illness insurance and, proactively engaging with customers to help them lead long and healthy lives.

Technology is changing the market, with access to information and care through mobile applications and innovations such as virtual health, telemedicine and virtual GP services. Data will also drive more accurate underwriting and wellness solutions at an individual customer level. The days of the fully personalised cover are not far off.

IPMI must comply with local laws and regulations and local needs that differ considerably from country to country.

IPMI overview contents

Volume 1

Introduction

  • Overview

  • Growth of need for IPM

  • Health insurance definitions

  • Expatriate definitions

  • Voluntary health insurance

  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate

  • Social and technological disruption

  • Duty of care

  • Why insurers are moving into PMI/IPMI

  • The changing insurance ecosystem

  • Customer centricity

  • Blockchain

  • Emerging markets

  • Belt and Road initiative

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • Asia

  • IPMI must cover more than insurance

  • The future

International health insurance numbers

  • Global premium figures

  • Onshoring and offshoring

  • Premium retention in countries

  • Premiums and local taxes

  • Local partnerships

  • Muddying the waters

  • It is not health insurance

Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance

  • Health insurance market potential

  • Global medical price trends

  • Health insurance pricing trends

  • Global health insurance price and trends

  • Health insurance and universal healthcare

  • Global benefits

  • Digital transformation

Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2018

  • Global healthcare

International health insurance market

  • Buying the market overseas

  • Distribution

  • Healthcare or health insurance

  • History

  • Market potential

  • Hospitals offering health insurance

  • Numbers of insurers

  • Insurance companies

  • Latin American healthcare potential

  • Lloyd’s of London

  • Lloyds’ brokers

  • Managing general agents

  • Third party administrators

  • Insurance brokers

  • Financial advisors

  • Insurance agents

  • Banks

  • Health insurance trade bodies

  • Health insurance comparison sites

  • Micro insurance

  • Mobile devices

  • Self- insurance

  • Smart phones

  • Social media

  • Videos

International health insurance products

  • Cover

  • International insurance versus domestic insurance

  • IPMI in 2019

Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures

  • Global number of expatriates

  • Global population

  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees

  • Global mobility

  • Expatriate population as % of worldwide population

  • Expatriate or international migrant

  • Refugees and expatriates

  • International students

  • Migrant workers

  • Cross border workers

  • Diasporas

  • Migration and health

Customers

  • Target markets for insurers

  • What is an expatriate?

  • Expatriate characteristics

  • Expatriate salaries and benefits

  • Buyers

  • Dependants

  • Emerging markets middle class

  • Generation Y

  • More than one product

  • High net worth

  • How people choose international health insurance

  • Indian companies

  • Maritime

  • Mining

  • Music industry

  • NGOs

  • Need

  • Oil and gas

  • Overseas employees need support

  • Questions potential customers ask

  • Retirees

  • Self-employed

  • Short assignments

  • Short-term cover

  • Singles

  • Students

  • Target ages

  • Teachers

  • Wealthy expatriates

  • Who can be covered?

  • Why companies buy it

  • Why individuals buy it

  • Why needs are changing

  • Why not just buy cover locally

  • Women

The product

  • Addiction treatment

  • Admitted policies

  • Apps

  • Big data

  • Budget covers

  • Cancer

  • Chatbots

  • Choice of cover or set packages

  • Claims

  • Compliance with local law

  • Co-payments

  • Critical illness

  • Currency

  • Danger zones

  • Diabetes treatment

  • Diaspora insurance

  • Duty of care

  • Emergency assistance

  • Emergency evacuation

  • European Air Medical Institute

  • Fertility treatment

  • Fraud

  • Funeral plans

  • Global cover

  • Helplines

  • Income protection

  • Insurers rethink of health insurance

  • International medical accreditation

  • Medical evacuation and repatriation

  • Medical tourism and insurance

  • Medical travel insurance

  • Mental health

  • Micro health insurance

  • Obesity treatment

  • Organ transplants

  • Passive war

  • Political risks

  • Pricing

  • Price regulation

  • Pricing on group schemes

  • Private repatriation

  • Risk management

  • Second medical opinion

  • Security and travel advice

  • Takaful

  • Takaful health

  • Telehealth

  • Term life

  • Top up covers

  • Travel insurance

  • Underwriting

  • Virtual doctors

  • War risks

  • Wearables

Volume 2 Companies

National, regional and local insurers and brokers

  • Base country

  • HQ

  • Ownership

  • Overview

  • Structure

  • Insurance

  • Healthcare

  • Customer numbers

  • Strategy

  • 2018 results

  • 2019 forecasts

  • Buying businesses

  • Selling businesses

  • Failed deals

  • Partnerships

  • Sponsorships

  • Micro health

  • Products

  • Apps

  • Marketing

  • Technology

  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

  • Countries A to Z

Company profiles

  • A Plus

  • Abacare

  • Achmea

  • ADNIC

  • AIA

  • AIG

  • Aetna

  • Ageas

  • Alan

  • Allegiant

  • Alliance Group

  • Allianz

  • Amariz

  • Amazon

  • Anbang

  • Antae

  • Anthem

  • AON

  • Apple

  • APRIL

  • Ardonagh

  • ASSSA

  • Aviva

  • AXA

  • Bellwood Prestbury

  • Berkshire Hathaway

  • Blue Cross

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Bupa

  • CCW

  • Chubb

  • Cigna

  • Clements Worldwide

  • CM International

  • Collinson

  • CXA

  • DFV

  • Daman

  • DavidShield

  • Discovery

  • Doha Insurance

  • Exclusive Healthcare

  • Expacare

  • Expatriate Group

  • Fairfax

  • Fosun

  • Freedom Health

  • Gallagher

  • General & Medical

  • Generali

  • Global Benefits

  • Global Underwriters

  • Great West Lifeco

  • Gulf Insurance Group

  • Haven Healthcare

  • Healix

  • HealthCare International

  • Henner

  • Humana

  • Integra Global

  • Jubilee

  • LAMP

  • Liberty Mutual

  • Lloyds

  • Lockton

  • Malakoff Médéric Humanis

  • MAPFRE

  • Marsh McLennan

  • Medgulf

  • Medibank

  • Medicover

  • Met Life

  • MMI

  • Morgan Price

  • Munich

  • Mutua Madrilena

  • National Life and General

  • New India

  • nib

  • NN Group

  • Now Health International

  • Nugent Sante

  • Old Mutual

  • Oman Insurance

  • Pacific Cross

  • Pacific Prime

  • Pan-American Life

  • Premier Group

  • Primary Group

  • Punter Southall

  • Qatar Insurance

  • QBE

  • RBI Premium

  • Regency Assurance

  • Saham

  • Saico

  • JW Seagon

  • Seven Corners

  • Siaci Saint Honore

  • Sompo

  • Starr

  • State Life

  • Status Global

  • Swiss Global

  • Swiss Life

  • Tokio Marine

  • UnitedHealth

  • Union Insurance

  • Vienna Insurance

  • WAFA

  • William Russell

  • Willis

  • Zhong An

  • Zurich

Volume 3 countries

Country profiles look at:

* Healthcare, healthcare reforms and price controls

* State health insurance and planned reform

* Compulsory health and travel health insurance and planned reforms

* Private health insurance and supplementary covers

* Health insurance regulation and planned reform

* Health insurance price regulation and planned reform

* Specific data and requirements for expats

COUNTRY PROFILES

  • Healthcare

  • Healthcare for expatriates

  • Healthcare regulators

  • Healthcare regulation

  • Healthcare price regulation

  • State health insurance

  • State health insurance top up

  • Compulsory health insurance for locals

  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates

  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students

  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors

  • Health insurance for locals overseas

  • Private health insurance

  • Insurance company and broker regulators

  • Health insurance regulation

  • Health insurance price regulation

  • 2019 population

  • 2030 population estimate

  • UN 2017 number of international immigrants- inbound

  • UN 2017 number of international emigrants- outbound

  • UN numbers of refugees

  • Local figures on expatriate numbers

  • Local figures on expatriate sources

  • Local figures on Diaspora

  • Leading local health insurers

  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers

  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activities

COUNTRIES

  • Abu Dhabi

  • Afghanistan

  • Albania

  • Algeria

  • Andorra

  • Angola

  • Antigua

  • Argentina

  • Armenia

  • Australia

  • Austria

  • Azerbaijan

  • Bahamas

  • Bahrain

  • Bangladesh

  • Barbados

  • Belarus

  • Belgium

  • Belize

  • Bermuda

  • Bolivia

  • Bosnia

  • Botswana

  • Brazil

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Brunei Darussalam

  • Bulgaria

  • Burkina Faso

  • Burundi

  • Cambodia

  • Canada

  • Cayman Islands

  • Chile

  • China

  • Colombia

  • Costa Rica

  • Croatia

  • Cuba

  • Curacao

  • Cyprus

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Dubai

  • Ecuador

  • Egypt

  • Estonia

  • Ethiopia

  • Fiji

  • Finland

  • France

  • Georgia

  • Germany

  • Ghana

  • Gibraltar

  • Greece

  • Grenada

  • Guatemala

  • Guernsey

  • Guyana

  • Honduras

  • Hong Kong

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Iran

  • Iraq

  • Ireland

  • Israel

  • Italy

  • Jamaica

  • Japan

  • Jersey

  • Jordan

  • Kazakhstan

  • Kenya

  • Kuwait

  • Kyrgyzstan

  • Latvia

  • Lebanon

  • Lesotho

  • Libya

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Macau

  • Macedonia

  • Malawi

  • Malaysia

  • Maldives

  • Malta

  • Mauritius

  • Mexico

  • Moldova

  • Monaco

  • Mongolia

  • Montenegro

  • Morocco

  • Mozambique

  • Myanmar

  • Nepal

  • Netherlands

  • New Zealand

  • Nicaragua

  • Nigeria

  • Norway

  • Oman

  • Pakistan

  • Panama

  • Papua New Guinea

  • Paraguay

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Puerto Rico

  • Qatar

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • Rwanda

  • Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • Saudi Arabia

  • Serbia

  • Sierra Leone

  • Singapore

  • Slovak Republic

  • Slovenia

  • Somalia

  • South Africa

  • South Korea

  • Spain

  • Sri Lanka

  • Sudan

  • Swaziland

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

  • Syria

  • Taiwan

  • Tanzania

  • Thailand

  • Trinidad And Tobago

  • Tunisia

  • Turkey

  • Turks And Caicos

  • Uganda

  • Ukraine

  • United Arab Emirates

  • United Kingdom

  • Usa

  • Uruguay

  • Venezuela

  • Vietnam

  • Yemen

  • Zambia

  • Zimbabwe

Read more...

International Health Insurance 2019: The Definitive iPMI Market Report

Leading international private medical insurance publisher iPMI Magazine is excited to announce the launch of “International Health Insurance 2019 - International Health Insurance for Expats, High Net Worth Individuals, 3rd Country Nationals, Domestic Nationals and Global Nomads: Volume 1, 2 and 3. 

There are more opportunities than ever for insurers and brokers to sell health insurance globally to locals and internationals.

  • The global demand for health insurance is rising fast;
  • There are opportunities for health insurers and brokers;
  • The numbers of expatriates are rising and will increase;
  • IPMI and PMI are no longer separate;
  • Locals, students and NGO workers need cover;
  • Many more countries are making health insurance compulsory;
  • Healthcare and health insurance are becoming intertwined;
  • Top up cover and micro health have massive potential;
  • Technology will change how insurers, brokers and customers interact.

International private medical insurance is flourishing. There are more globally mobile individuals than ever before - and employers are building businesses in more diverse countries.

Volume 1 Market Overview: April 2019 (230 pages)
Volume 2 Companies: Available July 2019 - 133 company profiles (over 500 pages)
Volume 3 Countries: Available September 2019 - 180 country profiles (over 600 pages)

PRICING: iPMI Magazine advertisers and subscribers enjoy complete access to ALL 3 VOLUMES of International Health Insurance 2019 at a specially negotiated reduced price*. Other retailers are charging £3600 for all 3 volumes and £1400 for individual volumes.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in insurance. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports and undertakes research for companies and has London market management experience with brokers and insurers. 

REPORT PRICE COMPARISON: To view International Health Insurance 2019 on Research and Markets and compare their price VS the price at iPMI Magazine please click here.

BUY NOW: To order this must have IPMI market report simply write to ipmi[at]ipmimagazine.com and we shall do the rest. Once we receive your order an invoice will be issued directly by the report author, and once that is paid and processed, a complete copy of the report will be made available to you in PDF format.

*This offer is only available when you purchase this report via iPMI Magazine. 

RELATED IPMI MAGAZINE READING: Understanding PMI And IPMI Market Size Per Country

ABOUT iNTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 2019

International private medical insurance (IPMI) was traditionally considered an exclusive health insurance plan for expatriates. Now, the definition of an expatriate is obsolete because more people, including local nationals and expats, regularly travel internationally, due to their lifestyle, income and careers.

These people need international medical insurance irrespective of their national status or residency. Local nationals, expats, and global nomads are driving demand for IPMI products well beyond any residency classification.

The globally mobile population has grown dramatically along with the increased global business. There are 66 million expatriates, and by 2020 this will be 87.5 million. 260 million people now live away from their country of birth and within a decade the total number of expatriate workers and international students will be 100 million.

IPMI as health insurance without borders is the future of health insurance for all people irrespective of their country of nationality, residence or current domicile. The domestic health insurance market is changing and expanding in many markets around the world. Technology, innovation in health treatment and digitisation of processes are also powerful shapers of the future of health insurance.

Compulsory insurance, voluntary top-up covers, differences between what you can sell to locals and expatriates, rules on overseas investors, compulsory local partnerships, economic sanctions, and even local politics are all things that insurers and brokers must understand- as are newer factors of controls on insurance and healthcare prices, and recent compulsory health insurance rules for travellers or students.

There have been several new entrants to the global healthcare insurance and ancillary services market, long dominated by a small handful of existing insurance companies. Regional insurers and brokers are active in the sector.

The focus on wellness and the proactive approach of keeping customers healthy is a key change. The focus is health insurance, not just illness insurance and, proactively engaging with customers to help them lead long and healthy lives.

Technology is changing the market, with access to information and care through mobile applications and innovations such as virtual health, telemedicine and virtual GP services. Data will also drive more accurate underwriting and wellness solutions at an individual customer level. The days of the fully personalised cover are not far off.

IPMI must comply with local laws and regulations and local needs that differ considerably from country to country.

IPMI overview contents

Volume 1

Introduction

  • Overview

  • Growth of need for IPM

  • Health insurance definitions

  • Expatriate definitions

  • Voluntary health insurance

  • Why IPMI and PMI are no longer separate

  • Social and technological disruption

  • Duty of care

  • Why insurers are moving into PMI/IPMI

  • The changing insurance ecosystem

  • Customer centricity

  • Blockchain

  • Emerging markets

  • Belt and Road initiative

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • Asia

  • IPMI must cover more than insurance

  • The future

International health insurance numbers

  • Global premium figures

  • Onshoring and offshoring

  • Premium retention in countries

  • Premiums and local taxes

  • Local partnerships

  • Muddying the waters

  • It is not health insurance

Health insurance

  • Compulsory health insurance

  • Health insurance market potential

  • Global medical price trends

  • Health insurance pricing trends

  • Global health insurance price and trends

  • Health insurance and universal healthcare

  • Global benefits

  • Digital transformation

Healthcare

  • Health at a Glance Europe 2018

  • Global healthcare

International health insurance market

  • Buying the market overseas

  • Distribution

  • Healthcare or health insurance

  • History

  • Market potential

  • Hospitals offering health insurance

  • Numbers of insurers

  • Insurance companies

  • Latin American healthcare potential

  • Lloyd’s of London

  • Lloyds’ brokers

  • Managing general agents

  • Third party administrators

  • Insurance brokers

  • Financial advisors

  • Insurance agents

  • Banks

  • Health insurance trade bodies

  • Health insurance comparison sites

  • Micro insurance

  • Mobile devices

  • Self- insurance

  • Smart phones

  • Social media

  • Videos

International health insurance products

  • Cover

  • International insurance versus domestic insurance

  • IPMI in 2019

Expatriate numbers

  • Expatriate figures

  • Global number of expatriates

  • Global population

  • Expatriates, migrants and refugees

  • Global mobility

  • Expatriate population as % of worldwide population

  • Expatriate or international migrant

  • Refugees and expatriates

  • International students

  • Migrant workers

  • Cross border workers

  • Diasporas

  • Migration and health

Customers

  • Target markets for insurers

  • What is an expatriate?

  • Expatriate characteristics

  • Expatriate salaries and benefits

  • Buyers

  • Dependants

  • Emerging markets middle class

  • Generation Y

  • More than one product

  • High net worth

  • How people choose international health insurance

  • Indian companies

  • Maritime

  • Mining

  • Music industry

  • NGOs

  • Need

  • Oil and gas

  • Overseas employees need support

  • Questions potential customers ask

  • Retirees

  • Self-employed

  • Short assignments

  • Short-term cover

  • Singles

  • Students

  • Target ages

  • Teachers

  • Wealthy expatriates

  • Who can be covered?

  • Why companies buy it

  • Why individuals buy it

  • Why needs are changing

  • Why not just buy cover locally

  • Women

The product

  • Addiction treatment

  • Admitted policies

  • Apps

  • Big data

  • Budget covers

  • Cancer

  • Chatbots

  • Choice of cover or set packages

  • Claims

  • Compliance with local law

  • Co-payments

  • Critical illness

  • Currency

  • Danger zones

  • Diabetes treatment

  • Diaspora insurance

  • Duty of care

  • Emergency assistance

  • Emergency evacuation

  • European Air Medical Institute

  • Fertility treatment

  • Fraud

  • Funeral plans

  • Global cover

  • Helplines

  • Income protection

  • Insurers rethink of health insurance

  • International medical accreditation

  • Medical evacuation and repatriation

  • Medical tourism and insurance

  • Medical travel insurance

  • Mental health

  • Micro health insurance

  • Obesity treatment

  • Organ transplants

  • Passive war

  • Political risks

  • Pricing

  • Price regulation

  • Pricing on group schemes

  • Private repatriation

  • Risk management

  • Second medical opinion

  • Security and travel advice

  • Takaful

  • Takaful health

  • Telehealth

  • Term life

  • Top up covers

  • Travel insurance

  • Underwriting

  • Virtual doctors

  • War risks

  • Wearables

Volume 2 Companies

National, regional and local insurers and brokers

  • Base country

  • HQ

  • Ownership

  • Overview

  • Structure

  • Insurance

  • Healthcare

  • Customer numbers

  • Strategy

  • 2018 results

  • 2019 forecasts

  • Buying businesses

  • Selling businesses

  • Failed deals

  • Partnerships

  • Sponsorships

  • Micro health

  • Products

  • Apps

  • Marketing

  • Technology

  • Start-ups, accelerators and labs

  • Countries A to Z

Company profiles

  • A Plus

  • Abacare

  • Achmea

  • ADNIC

  • AIA

  • AIG

  • Aetna

  • Ageas

  • Alan

  • Allegiant

  • Alliance Group

  • Allianz

  • Amariz

  • Amazon

  • Anbang

  • Antae

  • Anthem

  • AON

  • Apple

  • APRIL

  • Ardonagh

  • ASSSA

  • Aviva

  • AXA

  • Bellwood Prestbury

  • Berkshire Hathaway

  • Blue Cross

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Bupa

  • CCW

  • Chubb

  • Cigna

  • Clements Worldwide

  • CM International

  • Collinson

  • CXA

  • DFV

  • Daman

  • DavidShield

  • Discovery

  • Doha Insurance

  • Exclusive Healthcare

  • Expacare

  • Expatriate Group

  • Fairfax

  • Fosun

  • Freedom Health

  • Gallagher

  • General & Medical

  • Generali

  • Global Benefits

  • Global Underwriters

  • Great West Lifeco

  • Gulf Insurance Group

  • Haven Healthcare

  • Healix

  • HealthCare International

  • Henner

  • Humana

  • Integra Global

  • Jubilee

  • LAMP

  • Liberty Mutual

  • Lloyds

  • Lockton

  • Malakoff Médéric Humanis

  • MAPFRE

  • Marsh McLennan

  • Medgulf

  • Medibank

  • Medicover

  • Met Life

  • MMI

  • Morgan Price

  • Munich

  • Mutua Madrilena

  • National Life and General

  • New India

  • nib

  • NN Group

  • Now Health International

  • Nugent Sante

  • Old Mutual

  • Oman Insurance

  • Pacific Cross

  • Pacific Prime

  • Pan-American Life

  • Premier Group

  • Primary Group

  • Punter Southall

  • Qatar Insurance

  • QBE

  • RBI Premium

  • Regency Assurance

  • Saham

  • Saico

  • JW Seagon

  • Seven Corners

  • Siaci Saint Honore

  • Sompo

  • Starr

  • State Life

  • Status Global

  • Swiss Global

  • Swiss Life

  • Tokio Marine

  • UnitedHealth

  • Union Insurance

  • Vienna Insurance

  • WAFA

  • William Russell

  • Willis

  • Zhong An

  • Zurich

Volume 3 countries

Country profiles look at:

* Healthcare, healthcare reforms and price controls

* State health insurance and planned reform

* Compulsory health and travel health insurance and planned reforms

* Private health insurance and supplementary covers

* Health insurance regulation and planned reform

* Health insurance price regulation and planned reform

* Specific data and requirements for expats

COUNTRY PROFILES

  • Healthcare

  • Healthcare for expatriates

  • Healthcare regulators

  • Healthcare regulation

  • Healthcare price regulation

  • State health insurance

  • State health insurance top up

  • Compulsory health insurance for locals

  • Compulsory health insurance for expatriates

  • Compulsory health insurance for overseas students

  • Compulsory travel health insurance for visitors

  • Health insurance for locals overseas

  • Private health insurance

  • Insurance company and broker regulators

  • Health insurance regulation

  • Health insurance price regulation

  • 2019 population

  • 2030 population estimate

  • UN 2017 number of international immigrants- inbound

  • UN 2017 number of international emigrants- outbound

  • UN numbers of refugees

  • Local figures on expatriate numbers

  • Local figures on expatriate sources

  • Local figures on Diaspora

  • Leading local health insurers

  • Head office of leading health insurers and brokers

  • International health insurers/ brokers/agents activities

COUNTRIES

  • Abu Dhabi

  • Afghanistan

  • Albania

  • Algeria

  • Andorra

  • Angola

  • Antigua

  • Argentina

  • Armenia

  • Australia

  • Austria

  • Azerbaijan

  • Bahamas

  • Bahrain

  • Bangladesh

  • Barbados

  • Belarus

  • Belgium

  • Belize

  • Bermuda

  • Bolivia

  • Bosnia

  • Botswana

  • Brazil

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Brunei Darussalam

  • Bulgaria

  • Burkina Faso

  • Burundi

  • Cambodia

  • Canada

  • Cayman Islands

  • Chile

  • China

  • Colombia

  • Costa Rica

  • Croatia

  • Cuba

  • Curacao

  • Cyprus

  • Czech Republic

  • Denmark

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Dubai

  • Ecuador

  • Egypt

  • Estonia

  • Ethiopia

  • Fiji

  • Finland

  • France

  • Georgia

  • Germany

  • Ghana

  • Gibraltar

  • Greece

  • Grenada

  • Guatemala

  • Guernsey

  • Guyana

  • Honduras

  • Hong Kong

  • Hungary

  • Iceland

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Iran

  • Iraq

  • Ireland

  • Israel

  • Italy

  • Jamaica

  • Japan

  • Jersey

  • Jordan

  • Kazakhstan

  • Kenya

  • Kuwait

  • Kyrgyzstan

  • Latvia

  • Lebanon

  • Lesotho

  • Libya

  • Lithuania

  • Luxembourg

  • Macau

  • Macedonia

  • Malawi

  • Malaysia

  • Maldives

  • Malta

  • Mauritius

  • Mexico

  • Moldova

  • Monaco

  • Mongolia

  • Montenegro

  • Morocco

  • Mozambique

  • Myanmar

  • Nepal

  • Netherlands

  • New Zealand

  • Nicaragua

  • Nigeria

  • Norway

  • Oman

  • Pakistan

  • Panama

  • Papua New Guinea

  • Paraguay

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Poland

  • Portugal

  • Puerto Rico

  • Qatar

  • Romania

  • Russia

  • Rwanda

  • Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • Saudi Arabia

  • Serbia

  • Sierra Leone

  • Singapore

  • Slovak Republic

  • Slovenia

  • Somalia

  • South Africa

  • South Korea

  • Spain

  • Sri Lanka

  • Sudan

  • Swaziland

  • Sweden

  • Switzerland

  • Syria

  • Taiwan

  • Tanzania

  • Thailand

  • Trinidad And Tobago

  • Tunisia

  • Turkey

  • Turks And Caicos

  • Uganda

  • Ukraine

  • United Arab Emirates

  • United Kingdom

  • Usa

  • Uruguay

  • Venezuela

  • Vietnam

  • Yemen

  • Zambia

  • Zimbabwe

Read more...

iPMI Magazine Speaks With Jerome Droesch, CEO, Cigna, MENA

In this iPMI Magazine exclusive interview, Christopher Knight, CEO, iPMI Magazine, sits down with Jerome Droesch, CEO, Cigna following his appointment as Chief Executive Officer for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and Board Member of Cigna’s joint venture operations in India and Turkey.

Firstly, congratulations on your new appointment and thank you for sitting down to speak with us. May you introduce yourself and background in the international medical insurance market?

My name is Jerome Droesch. I am the CEO of Cigna for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and Board Member of Cigna’s joint venture operations in India and Turkey. I started my career in insurance in 1991 in France, with AXA, at a time when the industry was going through rapid transition around the world. It was exciting to witness the sector’s fast-paced evolution at the time. This dynamism across the various insurance segments, including medical insurance, has been a constant source of motivation for me. Today, I see unlimited opportunities for disruption in medical insurance, and I am glad to be part of this journey with Cigna, which has a 200-year legacy of driving innovation and impact in this space.  

You are responsible for building a customer-centric portfolio of offerings in the region in line with Cigna’s core promise to improve the health, well-being and peace of mind of those it serves. How will you do this?

Fortunately, I have access to a well-oiled and capable operations machinery at Cigna, where the priority has always been centered around improving the lives of the people we serve. This essentially means building products and solutions that complement the individual needs of the market. This speaks to our ambition to go deeper, go local and go beyond through network expansion, personalization and innovation.

To this end, we continue to invest in harnessing localized insights that can inform the decisions we make to customize our portfolio. You can already see this difference in the products and solutions we have introduced in the past year within the IPMI segment. Whether it is helping individuals adopt better lifestyle choices or expanding our support, so customers have access to healthcare anytime, anywhere, our focus is on guaranteeing well-being every step of the way.

Over the past year, Cigna has launched its first-ever individual private medical insurance (IPMI) solution for the Middle East region. Can you walk us through the features of this IPMI plan?

Cigna HealthguardSM is a flexible health plan created for individuals and their families living and working in Dubai. This unique offering fills a critical gap in the local health insurance market by meeting the long-term health and well-being needs of a globally mobile population – which was apparent through our research in the region. Our annual Cigna Wellbeing Survey, for example, showed that up to 45 percent of respondents in the UAE pay for their own medical expenses, and that a majority of individuals are concerned about financing their family’s long-term health needs.

In response to this, Cigna HealthguardSM offers a flexible structure and modular approach that allows customers to tailor their plans according to personal needs for their assured long-term well-being. The plan has three tiers - Regional, International and International Plus – which customers can choose from, based on their travel and budget requirements.

Earlier this year, we introduced a refreshed and updated version of this solution for our customers after listening to the feedback that they have shared with us over the last year.

Besides the core offering such as out-patient consultation, inpatient and day-patient hospital treatment, our plans include health screenings, preventative dental treatment, evacuation and repatriation. Customers also have the option to include the Enhanced Healthy Connect Module. This module offers benefits such as 360 health screenings, genetic cancer screening, allergy tests and dietetic consultations

Moreover, our extensive regional and international network as well as its professional network make Cigna HealthguardSM a standout global product for Dubai’s expatriate population. We have an international network comprising over one million relationships, including 96,000 behavioural healthcare professionals and 11,400 facilities and clinics. Cigna also offers 24/7 multilingual customer service that includes prior authorization requests, finding providers and claims enquiries, and ensuring customers have the very best of care available as and when needed.

The Cigna Wellbeing AppTM further enhances our IPMI offering by allowing customers to access tools and resources designed to help with all their wellness needs. These include a biometrics tracking dashboard, an extensive health library containing articles and recipes, general health and targeted health and personality assessments as well as lifestyle coaching across the health spectrum. It also includes a Tele-health feature that allows users to connect with a doctor or specialist via phone or video, from the convenience of their home or office.

How is the IPMI market developing in the 1, Middle East and 2, North Africa, and how will these markets evolve in the next 5 years?

The region’s insurance market is ripe for expansion, with factors such as a rapidly expanding population, growth of the middle and affluent classes, and rise in chronic health conditions contributing to this trend. In the GCC alone, healthcare expenditure is reportedly set to grow to US$104.6 billion in 2022 from an estimated US$76.1 billion in 2017. We are seeing similar growth in markets such as Lebanon, where healthcare spending accounts for over seven percent of the GDP.

Besides the ongoing efforts towards infrastructure development and general well-being awareness in the region, we expect digital innovation to play a vital role in the IPMI sector. Specifically, innovations driven by big data analysis and AI will bring much-needed efficiencies to the sector. We are seeing this change in countries such as the UAE, where the adoption of AI solutions is expected to increase the country’s GDP by $96bn by 2030.

What role do mandatory health insurance schemes play in the adoption of IPMI?

Mandatory health insurance is an important driver in the growth and adoption of IPMI products and services. In markets such as the UAE, where regulations to this effect have been longstanding, the demand for highly personalized care is on the rise. Whereas, in markets such as Oman, Bahrain and Kuwait, where mandatory health insurance policies are still at a nascent stage, there is room for more organic growth. This also comes down to the population mix in these markets. The UAE, with a 90 percent expatriate population offers a different playing field than Oman, for example, where the expat population accounts for just over 40 percent of the total. Yet, Oman’s Health Ministry confirms that only about nine percent of Omanis and 10 percent of expats in the private are currently insured, demonstrating a huge market opportunity waiting to be tapped.  

Can you explain what a typical IPMI customer looks like in the 1: Middle East, and 2, North Africa?

The main distinctions in customer profiles are more apparent in markets where we see a higher presence of expatriates. In the UAE, for example, our products cater more to the globally mobile population, including people who are likely to seek health treatments abroad and especially in their home country. In Lebanon, on the other hand, the focus is on localized healthcare. We introduced our global health benefits (GHB) proposition for employers in Lebanon in 2018, which on one hand guarantees access to the one million providers in our network worldwide, but also promises localized sales, underwriting and finance services to clients, as well as offers the insured population access to nuanced customer service and a strong network of 1,600 healthcare providers across the country. 

What do IPMI insurers need in 2019?

Insurers today are grappling with elevated levels of wastage, owing to insurance fraud especially within the individual medical insurance segment. This is a common challenge faced by the industry across the world, and one that costs millions on a yearly basis. Digital intervention and AI are increasingly paving the way for a more transparent and less fraudulent insurance ecosystem. However, greater collaboration between the public and private sector will further mitigate the effects of this issue. Knowledge-sharing and a timely exchange of best practices can streamline the sector in a way that was previously not possible. In 2019, we also need to see more provisions in place to build individual insurance offerings around the needs of the customer, whether it means greater security or more convenient access to healthcare. 

One of the most widely asked questions at iPMI Magazine is how big is the IPMI market. What do you think?

There is no single number that could effectively gauge the value of the global IPMI market. Fluctuations due to population rise, policy changes and other factors continue to impact IPMI prospects. Various reports value the global IPMI market between $12 billion to $13 billion in 2015-16, expected to grow to over $20 billion by 2019.

Last and not least, if you could live anywhere, on land or at sea, where would it be?

It would be Biarritz in France. I have a beach house there and the city is very lively and famous for surfing.

Related: Cigna Insurance Middle East Names Jerome Droesch New Chief Executive Officer

Learn more about Cigna IPMI and read news, articles and interviews on the micro website on iPMI Magazine, click here.

 

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Delivered digitally in PDF format, iPMI Magazine market research reports contain all the insurance and healthcare business intelligence you need to make well informed cross-border business decisions. The results of over 60 years of combined IPMI market research, iPMI Magazine reports are where leaders learn from leaders from in-depth, specific and high targeted technical market contents.